Labella Green Fashion

This boutique is the darling of discerning Saigonese, expats and tourists. Westerners love being able to look fabulous in Vietnamese designs, available in larger sizes. Labella displays evening gowns, casual wear, accessories and shoes. Featuring both simple and sophisticated patterns and cuts, shoppers of any taste will leave with a full bag and a satisfied smile. Labella is located on Pasteur in downtown HCMC.

Labella carries a fine gathering of silk, jersey, and cotton separates and dresses, as well as silk sleep and loungewear. Some of their designs such as Roman-style jersey dresses, are uncomplicated. If eccentricity is your thing, try a silk wraparound halter and sequined skirt. Women fashion brand Labella began in 2003, originating from brand SxS which was established in 1997. Initially, Labella occupied a small one-floor shop in Ho Chi Minh City. Today its three-floor store in central Saigon draws big crowds.

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L'Usine

HCMC's L'usine is a haven for everything the rest of the world forgot. A loft cafe, vintage racing bike and Lomo heaven, L'usine also sells clothes to go along with your espresso. Don't know what Lomo is? Visit L'usine. The Champs-Elysees meets Bleeker Street in classic Saigon style. While away the hours or buy some hip gear. Whatever makes your day go easier is sure to be found at L'usine. Brands found at L'usine include AIAIAI, Baxter of California, BoAime, Clae, Moleskine and Yumaki among many others.

More than just a fashion boutique, café and art gallery, L'usine is a contemporary Vietnamese experience in the heart of Saigon. L'usine's founders have designed a space that not only showcases global fashion but celebrates modern Vietnamese creativity, inspired by the timeless elegance and enterprising industry of the Indochina era. The boutique's bricks and mortar physical space suggests a 1930s French garment factory. Enjoy freshly cut sandwiches and home-style cakes made with quality ingredients.

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Ipa Nima HCMC

A colourful arrangement of fashion and function, Ipa Nima Boutique shop is the brainchild of Christina Yu and has been creating accessories full of invention and flair since 1997. Focusing on purses, the design-first mentality leads to pieces that reflect style and symmetry, all steeped in a heavy dose of soul. Their support of Saigon non profits brings social responsibility to the table. In Vietnam they have four locations, two in Ho Chi Minh City and two in Hanoi.

Looking for funky, original handbags with flair? Head to Ipa-Nima in Ho Chi Minh City. There are two locations in the city. Although the Saigon stores are not as big as their flagship shop in Hanoi, you'll still marvel at the selection on offer. Shop amidst a violet, boudoir-esque interior and pick out an edgy handbag designed with vintage flair. Ipa-Nima is open daily from 9am to 9pm.

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Future of Fashion in Saigon

Fashion has exploded in the last decade. Reality shows like Project Runway and Next Top Model have intrigued young designers, and a design revolution has been brewing for some years now.

Vietnam Fashion Week is in its third year and is incredibly successful. There is a higher demand for quality products. And with the advent of the new Takashimaya mall, international brands have suddenly poured into Vietnam in droves. But is it all sustainable? One of the country’s most recognised young designers, and founder of Vietnam Fashion Academy, Huy Vo, believes not so much; at least, not yet.

Photo: Edi Luong, Model: Kim Nha, Designer: Ivan Tran, Makeup: Minh Chu

In 2007-2010, the boutique fashion scene was thriving. Shops sprang up like wildfire, and the rich Vietnamese found wonderful new clothes to buy. But after the stock market plummeted, sales slowed, and the short burst of success gave way to a more revealing truth: the trendy young designers who started strong now realised they had little foundation to support themselves. Shops began to close, giving way to big name retail spaces.

Big Brand Dilemma

The fashion scene is still growing, but the question still remains: how can domestic designers and brands compete with the wave of big brands jumping on the bandwagon? Huy Vo mentions three crucial factors for any designer’s success in the marketplace: brand identity, customer service and quality.

Photo via Pixabay

The first two - brand identity and customer service - are easy. Many young designers are inherent digital marketers, and naturally use Facebook and Instagram to promote their products in ingenious ways. Serving their customers doesn’t seem to be an issue either. But when quality comes into question, there’s a noticeable gap. What good is a trendy blouse if it doesn’t look great after two washes? Or a nice pair of jeans if they fall apart after six months?

Vendors in Saigon Square kept producing faker fakes for profit, killing themselves in the process. On the other side, many young designers started out curious and ambitious, but without the foundation of knowledge required to build a sustainable clothing business.

True Domestic Quality

With malls you get the surface - the presentation, the brand, the space - but not what people actually want to buy. Where do people actually shop these days? Social media is a powerful tool for young designers, and chat apps and social networking sites like Zalo and Facebook have everyone from teens to middle-aged adults selling their wares. Then there are the corner shops near home, and online Amazon-like sites like Lazada and Leflair.

 

Photo via Pixabay

True domestic quality comes in the form of passionate designers with sustainable brands - thinkers who think forward. Notable names include Antonio De Torres, Lam Gia Khang, Huy Tran, Do Manh Cuong, Adrian Anh Tuan, Li Lam and Cong Tri, among others. Some examples of good fashion boutiques are Nosbyn, Cashew, Wephobia, Ren, The Blue T-Shirt, Thuy Design House and Annacoco.

Huy Vo says the problem with any industry in Vietnam is that many upcoming players think in trends, not sustainability. When the question is posed, will it last in the next 5-10 years? There are blank stares. When asked whether the brand will ever make it overseas, the question is likely dismissed.

To see what happens next just look at coffee shops: there seems to be a new cafe popping up every day, and another closing the next. Investors pump money into the cafes, the owners sell, the staff are secondary, and eventually the project goes bust. There’s a common thread here.

The Missing Factor

Huy Vo stresses the need for education, how knowledge creates a solid foundation. What if you know how to draw a beautiful piece of clothing, but don’t understand how it’s constructed? And then there is the question of history. Some young designers figure they don’t need to know the history of fashion in order to design - but you ask them what were the styles of the 20s and 40s and they come up with surface-level answers, says Huy Vo. They don’t understand the background of the time, the trends, the political situation, the movements of the era that influenced the style.

World Class

This doesn’t mean the shopping scene in Vietnam, and particularly in Ho Chi Minh City, is lacking in world-class products. Almost anything handmade in Vietnam is beautiful. Lacquerware, embroidery and textiles are of first rate quality. Items like these have much potential, with enough culture and craftsmanship behind them to create an excellent story. In this case, the brand identity is missing, but the quality (and sometimes even the service) is there.

 Photo: Edi Luong, Model: Kim Nha, Designer: Ivan Tran, Makeup: Minh Chu

Marou chocolate and Vietnamese rice - both quality products that come from Vietnam - have reached international attention because of their quality and outreach. Vietnamese clothing can reach this potential, but there is a lot of work ahead for designers and business owners - mainly in the form of education and planning.

Huy Vo heads the Vietnam Fashion Academy at 14 Ton That Dam, 2nd Floor, Hotline: 09 2303 1188.

Header photo via Pixabay

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Passion for Fashion in HCMC Part 1: Sinhtolina

Bohemian Rhapsody

Before To Trinh – better known as Leo – started selling Sinhtolina’s line of expressive and unapologetically fun dresses, she was a young woman cutting sleeves and holes in her clothes to create new and original looks. This cultivated a spirit of liberty that informs her fashion practice today.

fashion designer

“It aims to bring the free spirit culture,” Leo says. “We have a lot of fashion brands here but nobody is actually doing, like, bohemian style.”

Sinhtolina’s dresses tend to have a Coachella, music festival vibe. There’s lots of colour and a lighthearted attitude about the clothes, which would look good with a seashell necklace and a folded beach towel, all on their way to some undisclosed good time. The exuberant patterns are like a wearable good mood.

fashion designer

Leo’s fashions are also distinguished by the liberties they take in revealing the human form. Both Vietnamese clothing brands and customers – at least in polite company, Leo says – shy away from clothing that trifles with modesty. Leo’s designs tend to be open at the reverse and display the wearer’s back, a favourite part of the human body for her.

Cultivating the Aesthetic

Leo is an interior designer by training, a practice that she explains makes her approach oriented to the materials rather than design. Traditionally, the hierarchy is reversed and clothing elements will accord to the design. “And then from (material selection), we will come up with shapes, we will come up with designs, function,” she says.

fashion designer

For her, fashion design is fabric and pattern first. Cotton and silk are her preferred media – “Light fabric, as light as possible because here in Vietnam it’s super hot,” she says. “This [method] is completely opposite of a fashion designer.”

fashion designer

Leo began selling her clothes about three years ago in private sales to customers. Today, the Sinhtolina fashion brand of dresses, tops and bottoms is sold at two stores: D2 restaurant-cum-retailer Kokoïs, and a seller in Nha Trang called LIVINcollective. Leo’s dresses start at $40. For $70, she offers custom-tailored pieces.

Image source: Leo HuynhTrinh - Sinhtolina

 

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Thai Tuan Silk

As one of the leading Vietnamese brands in the fashion textile industry for more than 23 years, Thai Tuan’s products are trusted by local and foreign customers alike thanks to their prestige and feel for fashion trends. Aspiring to become an "International brand globally providing fashion fabric", award-winning Thai Tuan makes a constant effort to use the latest technology to launch more breakthrough products that meet the needs and tastes of fashionistas all over the world.

thai tuan fashion

Driven by the desire to offer a high-end fabric shopping space of the best quality to women who love tailor-made clothes, Thai Tuan Silk officially opened their showroom at 222-224 Le Thanh Ton, District 1, on April 2nd, 2017. Their Identity is Ao dai made up of different materials such as Digital-printed fabric, a top-notch Jacquard fabric that adds a luxurious look to every creation, and stretching silk that ensures the greatest comfort.

thai tuan fashion model

Thai Tuan also cares for the environment and strives to protect the health of their customers. After many years of research, Thai Tuan has introduced two new products containing health protection features: Antibacterial fabric and UV resistant fabric.

Beside a wide range of fashion products, Thai Tuan also offers an Ao dai tailoring service at their showroom that provides you with the most beautiful custom-made ao dai to be had in Ho Chi Minh City less than three days.

 

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