Sustainable Shopping and Other Ways to be A Good Person

By: Molly Headley

International brands are suddenly touting their commitment to conservation and fair labour practices. Marketing companies are pasting words such as “ethical” and “sustainable” across their product packaging.

But how do we sort through all the claims and get honest info on where to shop in HCMC to make a positive impact on the environment and local population? Here are a few companies where you can feel good dropping some cash. These firms have jumped ahead of the curve by aligning their values with the ethical crusade.

From Organic Fabrics to Community Outreach

Metiseko’s website (www.metiseko.com) features photos of models clad in lush silk dresses posed alongside villagers from the mountainous minority regions of Vietnam. Other companies might use this contrast as just imagery in a simple marketing campaign but not Metiseko.

ShoppingImage source: scontent.fsgn2-1.fna.fbcdn.net

Ethical work conditions are a central part of Metiseko’s brand philosophy. Employees are paid higher wages than the minimum authorised by the government—the current government imposed  minimum wage for a non-state owned company in HCMC is VND3,980,000/month (USD175). Though according to reporting in 2017 by VNexpress, there are still issues with the minimum wage structure, most notably the fact that “the wage level is is not enough to live on.”

Metiseko employees work reasonable hours and are provided with health insurance and holidays. Language courses in French, English, Chinese and Vietnamese are open to all employees for their career development. Clothing that is unsold in the stores is donated to minority villages around Hoi An.

The fabrics used are either 100 percent organic cotton sourced from India, or 100 percent mulberry silk from Vietnam. They are dyed with low impact environmental dyes.

Sadly, according to Oceane Bataillon, Marketing & Sales Manager for Metiseko, “We are facing a disappearance of silk producers in Vietnam.” She said that as these producers disappear so do their crafts that have been passed down through generations, such as hand-screen printing and dyeing techniques. Chinese suppliers are providing cheaper and lower quality silk, or “fake silk” and this is hurting some Vietnamese suppliers who strive to create a quality product.

The market price for fake silk is very low and Metiseko prices may seem high in contrast but, according to a 2015 Nielsen report, younger generations are willing to pay more for goods that are created with a conscience. Both Millennials surveyed and Generation Z respondents (15-20 years old) said that they are more likely to buy from companies committed to “positive social and economic impact”. Marketing geared towards sales and discounts for the consumer didn’t even make it into the top five reasons to buy from a company.

“For those willing to spend more, the findings show that personal values are more important than personal benefits, such as cost or convenience.”

Blueberry Night (www.blueberrynightconcept.com) is another brand with ethical values. Their signature vintage cotton and linen fabrics are used for bedding, pillows, handbags and even yoga mat carriers.

Ariane Desaedeleer, co-owner of the brand talked about how she and her partner Virginie Nocquet run an “inclusive business” that directly benefits low-income communities by working with an NGO called FFSC (Friends for Street Children). The company raises money that contributes to a school that FFSC runs for migrant workers’ children unable to attend school.

“I worked for a decade in China where I've witnessed first hand the deplorable working conditions of women in factories. Here in Saigon, we work closely with our workshop located at the top floor of a bright, well-ventilated building and where workers work at their own pace and can have as many breaks as they wish”, Desaedeleer said.

ShoppingImage source: blueberrynightconcept.com

Blueberry Night products are in the "middle-high" price range in the Vietnamese market. “The slightly higher price tag is simply the result of fair wages paid to our seamstresses and of the high quality raw materials that are used.”

Artisanal Does Not Always Mean Fair Trade

The word “artisan” connotes” a skilled trade, especially one that involves making things by hand. The word “skilled” may give the impression that the worker will be paid well for their abilities. However, “artisan” has become a favorite term for marketing. The workers creating the “artisanal” products can still be underpaid, overworked, and subject to unsafe conditions.

Jacques Blanchard, the owner of My Way Deco (www.mywaydeco.com), a luxury lacquerware company in Vietnam, spoke to us about why respecting artisans matters.

“There are fewer and fewer artisans in Vietnam”, Blanchard said. “Vietnam will lose this beautiful tradition because the demand for it is weakening. Real lacquer is expensive. Cheap lacquer is just painting.”

ShoppingImage source: scontent.fsgn2-1.fna.fbcdn.net

For the degree of work that he and his clients expect, Blanchard said he needs the best artists for the job, and to do their detailed work those artists expect more than the bare minimum per month. The high level of skill of these artisans means that if they aren’t paid properly they won’t stay. Blanchard designs the pieces but he says he owes much of his success to the experienced hands of his workers. For example, for a recent creation for client Petrossian Caviar hundreds of beads were hand rolled out of yarn, wrapped in paper, lacquered an inky black and then glued individually onto a box. This is the kind of detail that Blanchard said is impossible to recreate with a machine.

Above My Way Deco’s main showroom in District 2 there is a workshop where the artisans work together. It is a light-filled room with soft music playing in the background. They work from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and have weekends off. Perhaps the strongest testament to the working conditions at My Way Deco is the fact that most of Blanchard’s team has been with him for 15 to 18 years.

Recycling for the Future

Other notable ecologically-minded companies are Zago Furniture (www.zago-store.vn) and Rostaing Tannery (www.rostaingtannery.com).

ShoppingImage source: zago-store.vn

Zago Furniture has an FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) Certification for eco-friendly products. FSC is an international NGO that sets the environmental and social standards for responsibly managed forests.

Rostaing Tannery, mentioned in the article “Leather de Luxe”, was the first in Vietnam to introduce renewable energy in the form of solar panels. Water used in the process is collected through rain harvesting and treating wastewater. Rostaing Tannery was also awarded the Ecologic Innovation Golden Award in Paris in 2011 for their chemical free tanning method.

Now, How Do You Get Your Ethical Purchases Home?

Evolve Mobility (www.evolvemobilityintl.com), owned and managed by Hoa Vu, is a moving logistics and warehousing company in Vietnam with a eye towards innovation. Annie Hansen, founder of Evolve Mobility, said that “The global packaging industry is a major contributor to the waste problem that the planet faces. Moving companies are notoriously traditional and generally do not proactively seek [sustainable] solutions … ”

ShoppingImage source: evolvemobilityintl.com

Evolve Mobility has incorporated a reduce, reuse, recycle policy and all of their boxes and paper materials are made in Vietnam from 100 percent recycled materials. Next on their radar is finding an alternative to bubble and plastic wrap, for which they are in the early stages of product development. The company also seeks to create the best environment for their workers. One way Evolve does this is by giving end-of-year bonuses to supervisors and the staff rather than shareholders.

“We believe that moving and logistics companies must evolve just as the consumers and clients we serve have evolved”, Hansen said. “What was important 20 years ago was profit. That thinking is now redundant. What we must now consider at each turn today is profit, people, planet.”

Contact Details:

Metiseko
157 Dong Khoi, Ben Nghe, District 1, HCMC

Blueberry Night
Available at The Closet  
Address: 81 Xuan Thuy, Thao Dien, District 2, HCMC
Phone: 090 838 40 85
www.blueberrynightconcept.com
www.facebook.com/blueberrynight.homedecor
www.instagram.com/blueberrynight.homedecor
Email: Blueberrynight.homedecor@gmail.com

My Way Deco
51 Street No.19, An Phu Ward, District 2, HCMC
Tel:+84.8 62960608
Email: sales@mywaydeco.com

Zago Furniture
49 Xuan Thuy, Thao Dien, District 2, HCMC
Phone: 028 2253 4248

Rostaing Tannery
Số 8, Tam An, Long Thanh, Dong Nai
Phone: 0251 3514 133

Evolve Mobility
16 Street, 19A, Thao Dien, District 2, HCMC
Phone: 028 6281 8266

Banner Image source:noipictures.com


Best Eco Friendly Cosmetics and Skincare in Saigon & Vietnam

By: Laura Nalin

Coconut Religion

Herpas

The Queen

A Banker’s Secret

Stone Hill

The Organik Shop

The Herbal Cup

Skinna

Within the past year, it seems that consumers throughout Vietnam are becoming increasingly interested in spending a little extra on eco-friendly products, in Saigon and elsewhere. A number of restaurants throughout Ho Chi Minh City are now providing metal or bamboo straws, stores are hawking reusable goods. People are collectively beginning to care more and more about the environment, and skincare is no exception to this movement.

As the demand for sustainable consumption continues to rise, so does the public’s desire for environmentally friendly cosmetics. Several Korean outlets throughout town such as Innisfree and Skin Food offer them and, more interestingly, plenty of local companies are making their way into the market, too.

Typically, all kinds of sustainable beauty products are clustered together under the umbrella of being “green,” or “organic,” but the products on this list go above and beyond. Each of these companies based in Vietnam source their formulas sustainably, use all-natural ingredients and offer eco-friendly packaging.

For those of you interested in buying some environmentally friendly cosmetics and skincare products in Saigon and beyond in Vietnam, look no further: here’s a list of some of my favourite brands, as well as a couple that I’m keen on trying.

Coconut Religion

coconutreligion.com

The Coconut Religion brand instantly made a name for itself in both the expat and local communities in Saigon and Vietnam in record time. It has been in operation for just a few months, but this travel-friendly, certified organic, raw cold-pressed coconut oil has become a staple in every recent market and event and also maintains a killer social media presence.

The Coconut Religion founder, Maggie Shen, is an Australian genius who not only sources the products from the fertile Mekong Delta region, but has made sure that the product stays thick and creamy despite the tropical heat. How cool is that? The ‘jungle to jar’ products have gained a cult following for a reason. The products come carefully packaged in all-natural fabric and I recently purchased her lavender coconut oil as well as the lip balm. Take my money, Coconut Religion.

Cosmetics and Skincare in SaigonImage source: Coconut Religion

The Queen

The Queen on Facebook

I attended a workshop at The Hive, in District 2 of Ho Chi Minh City, that promoted eco-friendly products last year. At that workshop, I and several other attendees created our own organic lipsticks using beeswax, organic argan oil, Vitamin E, coconut oil and natural pigments. I’ve been a fan of lipstick for most of my life, but I’ve become turned off at the thought of animal testing.

I wear my lipstick from The Queen daily; it’s not as thick as standard brands, but I enjoy that. While I’m not sure this brand has taken off quite yet throughout town, I stand behind the quality and thought that goes into the process to create such environmentally friendly cosmetics.

Cosmetics and Skincare in SaigonImage source: The Queen

Stone Hill

stonehill.vn

Another local brand in Vietnam making a name for itself is Stone Hill, an innovative business that produces natural products from Vietnamese cocoa plants. The company sources all of its cocoa from its own farm in Dong Nai Province, all of which is grown to quality standards and helps make the Stone Hill soaps and skincare products stand head and shoulders above less sustainable options.

I have a jar of Stone Hill’s cocoa butter, and I swear by it as it’s one of the only products that makes my chronically dry skin feel silky smooth. In addition to my favourite product, Stone Hill also offers cocoa-based scrubs, scented body butter, hand cream and a handful of scented soaps. Definitely check this one out if your skin needs some nourishment!

Cosmetics and Skincare in SaigonImage source: Stone Hill

The Herbal Cup

The Herbal Cup on Facebook

I haven’t tried any of these products yet, but The Herbal Cup, based in Ho Chi Minh City, has certainly been on my radar. One of the more interesting things about this company is that it provides a free consultation to decide which of its products are most suitable for your skin.

Each of the environmentally friendly skincare confections include organic ingredients such as gac fruit oil, centella, tomato, sesame and the ever-popular tea tree leaves. Consumers have the option from a number of creations such as scrubs, masks, lipsticks, cleansing gels and body lotions. Everything is locally sourced, so there will be no regrets after purchase.

Cosmetics and Skincare in SaigonImage source: The Herbal Cup

Herpas

Herpas on Facebook

The plant-based products created by Herpas’ owner Ha Truc Le were originally intended to encourage Vietnamese consumers to purchase locally-made products. Truc’s concoctions are formulated through her extensive knowledge of natural healing properties, which is what makes Herpas such an interesting, environmentally friendly cosmetics and skincare line. Her lotions, scrubs and oils are intended to lock in moisture and reduce the effects of ageing, ideal for the amount of toxic chemicals our skin is exposed to here.

Cosmetics and Skincare in SaigonImage source: Herpas

A Banker’s Secret

A Banker's Secret on FB

Have you ever read stories about people who were living traditional lifestyles, working in high-income positions who ended up quitting their job to follow their passion? That’s precisely what Quynh, the founder of A Banker’s Secret did. Before catalysing the concept of A Banker’s Secret, Quynh was working as, well, you guessed it: a banker. She spent her free time creating handmade scented soaps for her loved ones, and soon realised that’s what she would rather be doing full-time.

Quynh quit her job in 2012, and has embarked on an exciting journey since, turning her labour of love into a thriving environmentally friendly cosmetics and skincare company in Vietnam. Although she simply sold just scented soaps at the start, Quynh now offers masks, scrubs, essential oils, cream oils and pomade as well.

Cosmetics and Skincare in SaigonImage source: A Banker’s Secret

The Organik Shop

organik.vn

Located in the heart of Saigon’s District 2, on the busy Thao Dien Street, sits this store, which is known for carrying some of the highest quality, environmentally friendly cosmetics and skincare in Vietnam. Not only that, but it’s a one-stop-shop for those of you who are also keen on revamping your entire lifestyle into a more sustainable, eco-friendly, non-toxic one; there are plenty of food, household and skincare items available for your ethical shopping needs.

Cosmetics and Skincare in SaigonImage source: The Organik Shop

Skinna

Skinna on Facebook

I think it’s safe to say that many people across the globe would agree that grandmothers encompass some sort of mystical wisdom. More interestingly, Skinna was derived from that notion. Over a decade ago, Christine Ho was talking to her grandmother when she realised the matriarch of her family had some pretty interesting beauty secrets up her sleeve. Ho’s grandmother provided some ancient Vietnamese beauty tips that were passed down from the Hue royal lineage; some of the holistic recommendations include household ingredients such as eggs and turmeric as natural exfoliants.

Cosmetics and Skincare in SaigonImage source: Skinna

Each of Skinna’s products cater to varying skin types and conditions. Items sold include lipstick, serums, creams, cleansing products, sheet masks and body wash, making Skinna one of the most prosperous environmentally friendly cosmetics and skincare providers in Saigon and Vietnam!

Banner Image source: nyscc.org


Saigon’s Secret Organic Food Suppliers

By: Molly Headley

The search for truly organic food in Vietnam has always been a bit difficult.

Ines Quoico, owner of The Organik Shop and Organik Da Lat Farm, previously told City Pass Guide that not only are there no certifications issued for organic farms in Vietnam, but the ordeal of getting certified through the European Union, a similar US food safety body or another certifying organisation involves finding land that is not infected with dioxin, then flying in auditors to test the soil, the water, the fertilisers, and to perform countless other trials.

Yet, without these certifications the word “organic” holds no weight. What’s more organic farms are complicated and costly to run as a result.

ShoppingImage source: foodsafetycertifiers.com

Yet, these challenges don’t change the fact that there is a demand for safe, well-made food in Vietnam. When people read another news story about a food scandal such a battery acid allegedly being used to darken coffee, or formaldehyde extending the shelf life of noodles, they turn towards labels they feel like they can trust and organic fits that bill. A report in Vietnam News estimates that organic food revenues have reached VND3 trillion.

So where can you go to find products with that little green organic label? Most supermarket chains carry at least a small selection of organic fruits and veggies from Da Lat at this point but the big players in the organic food scene are mainly in well-heeled D2. Nam An Market and The Organik Shop are the places to go for the biggest selection but Annam Gourmet and BlackMarket also feature a nice choice of organic offerings amongst their international imports. D7 and D1 have similar stores.

ShoppingImage source: ibb.co

But where do you go if you’re interested in smaller businesses, specialty products, or food delivery? Read on.

Farm to Doorstep

Looking for a food delivery service that is a bit more health conscious than Domino’s Pizza? Vuon Rau can deliver boxes of fresh fruits and vegetables right to your door. The organic products are clearly marked across the top with a green banner. The website is in Vietnamese, use Google Translate to navigate. Plus, then you can enjoy reading through some of the blog posts that read like Williams Carlos Williams poems such as this one:

It was a red plastic tray, lined with thick, golden sheets of paper, in which ripe tomatoes were sitting next to each other listening to the car's sound at night.

ShoppingImage source: happydaytravel.com

Chopp delivery is a grocery delivery service that consolidates all of your market shopping into one easy to use website and app. A quick search of the word “organic” pops up 274 products, from imported baby food to fruits and vegetables that the service will pick up for you at Naman, The Organik shop or numerous other locations.

Vegan Snacks

La Holista is more than just a place to grab healthy food. It’s a one-stop shop for a full body recharge. La Holista focuses on health coaching and meal plans for corporations and schools as well as cooking classes and healthy shopping tours. But most importantly they’ve got great snack options, such as organic cashews, quinoa salad and kombucha. Products can be ordered on their website and delivered to your door in HCMC.

ShoppingImage source: laholista.com

For more vegan snacks in Thao Dien, check Patty’s Kitchen out. They offer vegan options such as dips, dishes but also meal prep plans and cooking classes. Their best seller is definitely their hummus. They cook MSG and sugar-free food and use as little oil and salt as possible.

ShoppingImage source: simplyrecipes.com

Where to Get Your Greens

Green Around the Corner (23 Street 61, D2), a light-filled café tucked into the hems of Thao Dien, can be hard to find but it’s worth the search. Not only can you curb your mid-day hunger pangs with hearty vegan salads and nut-based cheeses, you can also buy their products to take away. This is the place to go if you want to do your part in reducing plastic waste—here, you can pick up a set of reusable glass, stainless steel or bamboo drinking straws.

ShoppingImage source: facebook.com/greenaroundthecorner

The Organik House in District 1 serves healthy vegetarian fair with an international flare. Their juices are organic but that’s not all: this is one of the few places in town that you can buy truly organic wine.
Address: 7F Nguyen Thị Minh Khai, D1

ShoppingImage source: facebook.com/TheOrganikHouse

Sustainable Farming & Accountability

Les Vergers du Mekong does not list their products as organic, however, the company does make available information on how the fruits and vegetables used in their products are being farmed and whether it is sustainable. Les Vergers du Mekong prides itself on its traceability, meaning the consumer can follow the path of where the fruit was grown, what was added to it and how it was transformed into the product you hold in your hand. Ethically-sourced, juices, james, Fair Trade honey, coffee and tea are available.

ShoppingImage source: image.brigitte.de

Food vendor Maifarmi has a Facebook shop filled with photos of bright leafy greens and branches drooping under the weight of the ripe avocados on their farm. As with Les Vergers du Mekong, Maifarmi does not tout their organic certification but they are part of the farm to doorstep movement that is just beginning to get a foothold in Vietnam and are worth mentioning. You can order by contacting the growers on Facebook and they will deliver directly to your home.

If All Else Fails …

Grow your grub yourself. Saigon’s climate is perfect for balcony or windowsill gardening. Interested but don’t know where to start? Gagaco (So 2, Street 53,D2) is a shop for amateur greenskeepers to get all the gear—wooden planters, water systems and seeds—as well as to gain knowledge. Gagaco offers free gardening advice to anyone who asks.

Video source: FuseSchool - Global Education

Banner Image source: europarl.europa.eu


Three Secret HCMC Shops

By: Aleksandr Smechov

There are plenty of shops in Ho Chi Minh City full of amazing items - the only problem is finding them.

Rosemary Cook organises shopping tours in Ho Chi Minh City - taking her clients to little-known shops to discover a world of quality fashion, furniture and homeware unbeknownst to the general expat (and even local) population. We sat down with her to get three superb recommendations every shopping fan should visit.

Sadec District (3A Station, 3A Ton Duc Thang, D1 | +84 9 0384 6281)

Sadec is everything homeware and pottery. Most of their pottery comes from Asia, and it’s really stunning. Amai is one of their major brands - all the pieces were designed by two Dutch ladies who lived in Vietnam for many years, before selling everything to Sedec. Buying things here is quite addictive - you buy one and you keep wanting to buy more and more. The items have natural colours and “organic” shapes, so it never looks mass produced - there are also homeware made of thin but very durable porcelain. You can put items here in the dishwasher and bake things like souffles in their pots - they’ll withstand heat and pressure well. They also do things like hand and bath towels created from natural cottons, which are done in a very eco way - they’re quite thin but dry really well. These are also from Amai.

Photo via Sadec website

Sedec also makes table napkins with maps of old Saigon on them, as well as pillowcases. The shop also has these great cheese knives in the shape of a mouse. It’s a great little gift for someone and it comes beautifully boxed. Additional items at the shop include baskets, interesting bottles, and food covers for outside dining.

Thuy Design House (132 Dong Khoi, D1 | +84 28 3824 8343)

Thuy Design House is on Dong Khoi. Thuy herself is more of an artist - she never studied fashion formally. She studied art in Eastern Europe. Most of her clothes are like artworks. They’re stunning, with very interesting patterns and prints. Thuy has been a big player in Vietnam’s Fashion Week. Her clothes are made to fit anyone - and if they won’t fit she’ll make to order. A lot of her clothes are one-off pieces since they’re painted on, but she also has a standard line as well. She runs a place in District 2 called The Factory, which showcases and teaches about contemporary art. The Factory also runs workshops, has a gallery space, a library and a little cafe.

Kujean by Chuong Dang (47 Pham Ngoc Thach, D3 | +84 9 0886 6161)

Kujean is another unique shop. The owner, Chuong Dang, mostly focuses on making ao dai, but also buys jeans from flea markets in various chic cities, brings them back to Saigon and gives the pairs new life. He adds things like flowers and dragons onto the jeans, as well as various patterns. It’s a really cool shop that’s affordable for what it does. It’s in this little alley in District 3. The reason I found him is I saw a lady wearing his jeans and asked her where she got them. She let me get on her motorbike and led me to the shop. The owner has jeans for both men and women. If you have an old pair of jeans that are falling apart or that you want to customise, you can take them there and “tattoo” something onto them. They always serve you fresh fruit and tea. They really look after you.

Rosemary visits the above shops and many more on her shopping tour. She meets clients, gets a brief on what they’re looking for, takes a look at some of their staple pieces in their wardrobe and then spends all day going to secret shops that match her clients’ needs.


In The Mood - Saigon: Celebrating Artisans & True Craftsmanship

By: Zody Huynh

Something old, something new, something borrowed…

Good Things Take Time.

Transparency and Authenticity Matters.

The Place You Never Knew You Needed.

When I first heard about In The Mood - Saigon and how it was a home and lifestyle store that stays true to its Vietnamese roots, I was a bit apprehensive. After all, it was located in Thao Dien, the expat hub of Saigon. Let me be clear that nothing is inherently wrong with Thao Dien. It’s great if you’re looking for a quaint, relaxed area away from the honking of motorbikes or your local “bắp xào đây!” man biking his cart along to that fabulous, but far too loud jingle on rotation. It’s especially great if you have a family and prefer a more spacious living area. But how ‘Vietnamese’ could this place actually be?

Rarely am I surprised, but when I am, it is in the best kind of way. From the products to the people, it was refreshing to see In The Mood - Saigon reconnect to what has been lost in the mayhem of mass-produced, quick, shoddy goods commonly found in places like Ben Thanh Market. No, In The Mood - Saigon is something truly unique that is made for locals and expats alike, by locals and expats.

In The Mood Saigon

A part of The Snap Café, a rustic, stylish space housing a variety of boutiques, restaurants, and a café, In The Mood - Saigon’s storefront truly makes an impression on you as you first enter and, like its products, it’s something that lasts long after you’ve left. It’s calm. It’s quiet. It embodies the feeling of escape after having been in the city for too long and needing to get away to remind you why you’re in Vietnam in the first place. It’s how you’ve experienced sunrise upon waking up and stepping outside your door to be greeted by the countryside of Vietnam. It’s refreshing. 

Something old, something new, something borrowed…

Founders, Florence and Valentin, were both born and raised in France with Vietnamese ethnic roots, but made the physical and spiritual leap to Saigon to gain a better spiritual awareness and understanding of their Vietnamese culture and heritage. 

In The Mood Saigon

Both founders are no strangers to fashion design and décor, which made this an easy partnership marrying an eye for design and hunger for quality craftsmanship together. Florence has been in the fashion industry from a very early age working for high-end American and French sportswear and streetwear brands in Paris before she co-founded the brand, Anna Moï, the first French-Vietnamese Ethnic-Chic concept store in the center of Paris back in the 90’s. Valentin is no stranger to sourcing and retail, and has worked very closely with artisans to produce fine handcrafted home lines and decoration items for export to retailers in Europe, USA, Australia and also well-known designers.

Florence and Valentin were friends and residents of Saigon long before they were partners and, after having lived here for quite some time, they shared a common notion that things weren’t as it once was. 

“Our philosophy is to offer aesthetical and innovative decoration, clothing and accessories for Asian trendy homes and urban lifestyle.”

Good Things Take Time

While some things in front of us are far better than the things we’ve left behind, true craftsmanship is not one of them. Finding goods for a bargain price are always nice, but these goods rarely last. Quite frankly, consumers are always left wanting more. In the haze of mass-produced handicrafts and goods, quality has dwindled. Craftsmanship fundamentally implies that handcrafted goods are ‘special’ and made with proper care, time, and attention in the hands of local artisans. However, with the rise in mass-production of fast goods all of what makes craftsmanship special is essentially left at the door and in the hands of machinery. 

In The Mood Saigon

High-quality goods were traded out for everyone to enjoy, but locals and expats. Most high-quality handicrafts were getting exported to foreign, international markets. Florence and Valentin recognised a gap in the market for a sustainable, yet ambitious, fashion-forward retail business rooted in Vietnam-sourced goods. Thus, it became very clear that, with their Vietnamese-French hearts and spirits, In The Mood - Saigon was destined to happen.

Transparency and Authenticity Matters

Many foreign companies will contractually bind local artisans to misappropriate and resell their goods, which pigeonholes artisans from the acknowledgement they deserve. In The Mood - Saigon respects the spirit of true craftsmanship by building a brand around partnership and collaboration.

In The Mood Saigon

The founders were committed to bringing consumers back to the heart of what is special about this place we call home with a refined approach in lifestyle and home décor taking a contemporary French approach while maintaining the essence of Vietnamese traditions and the skills of local artisans.

The Place You Never Knew You Needed

When friends and family come to visit for the first time, I always hesitate on recommending places commonly featured on blogs, ahem, Ben Thanh Market. Is that how you really want to remember Vietnam in all its beauty? No, you tell them to go to In The Mood - Saigon to pick up this incredibly unique cinnamon box. I know what you’re thinking, but no, it’s not a box with cinnamon in it. The wooden box is made entirely of cinnamon bark, which gently infuses this aromatic spiced fragrance into whatever you put inside like salt or sugar. 

In The Mood Saigon

And for me, while I love my landlord dearly, that multi-coloured, floral printed bedding that was generously offered, no longer has a place in my home. In The Mood - Saigon offers 100% eco-friendly, locally sourced and designed satin cotton bedding. It feels just as good as it looks as their designs feature local artisans who pay homage to different eras of Vietnam. 

I wish I had known about In The Mood - Saigon sooner. Perhaps that’s the beauty of living in Vietnam. Something that was conceptualized only a few months ago can quickly become reality, right in your very own neighborhood. Nothing feels quite as special as knowing whatever you are purchasing is ethically sourced and made, but also authentic to the people who have created it. 

In The Mood – Saigon
32 Tran Ngoc Dien, Thao Dien, District 2, HCMC
P: +84 096 877 3862
Instagram: @inthemoodsaigonstore

Image source: In The Mood – Saigon


Hanoia Boutique is Now Open in Ho Chi Minh City

By: Sivaraj Pragasm

Hanoia, a high-end lacquer producer, has just launched its first boutique in Ho Chi Minh City on Monday July 3 in Ao Dai House (107 Dong Khoi, District 1).

hanoiaImage source: hanoialacquer

The store features exquisite lacquerware, including luxurious and elegant home decor, fine and fashionable jewellery, which combine both contemporary inspirations and traditional Vietnamese craftsmanship. As part of their grand opening, Hanoia boutique will offer special gifts for the early buyers.

Hanoia is the first haute-lacquer house in Vietnam, and its products are recognized by many luxury fashion boutiques around the world. Established in 1997 in an old lacquer village in Binh Duong province, Hanoia specialises in fusing traditional Vietnamese lacquerware with contemporary designs.

hanoiaImage source: hanoialacquer

Hanoia started when a group of European designers teamed up with the most qualified craftsmen from Hanoi, the Vietnamese lacquer capital, to revive a Vietnamese craft that was in danger of being lost. With the love of colours, effects and patterns evoking a sense of nostalgia, they work towards crafting a unique experience in a quality and detail-oriented process using ancestral techniques.

Hanoia owns two workshops in the north and the south of Vietnam with 300 artisans from traditional lacquer-producing villages and talented designers from Europe. Pursuing a philosophy based on innovation, the use of materials, effects, colours and shapes, Hanoia has continuously launched new and unique product lines.

hanoia

Image source: hanoialacquer

Hanoia has quickly gained a following from local and foreign artists, and fine art enthusiasts living in Hanoi, along with visitors from all over the world.

Contact:

Add: Ao Dai House – 107 Dong Khoi, Q.1, Ho Chi Minh city

Tel: +84 28 3827 9383

Website: www.hanoia.com | FB: facebook.com/hanoialacquer

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