The Power of Effective Feedback

By: Victor Burrill

The best leaders are those who ask for feedback and initiate employee engagement.

The need to learn and grow should be put forward.

Giving and receiving feedback is a skill.

Effective Feedback within the workplace results in closer relationships, better collaboration and increased effectiveness in performance. Business performance trainer and executive coach, Victor Burill, shares some valuable insight.

The Importance of Feedback in High-Performing Teams

According to a recent Forbes article, one of the essential characteristics of a high-performing team is one where the team members cultivate and practice an open feedback culture. These teams should provide and receive feedback regularly, regardless of position and tenure, in a productive way that should also deepen their relationships. Leaders can set the example by asking for feedback from team members, and responding positively versus defensively, effectively integrating the feedback into work behaviors.

Building an Open Feedback Culture starts with the Leader

Stephen R. Covey, the world renowned author and keynote speaker says...

“Leaders beware! The higher you go in an organisation, the less likely people are to give you straight feedback. Feedback is your life-support system. Without it, you will eventually fail. Do everything you can to create a culture where it is safe to give you feedback.”​

This should be taken as a motivational warning for any leader into creating an open feedback culture in the workplace.

The best leaders ask for more feedback, according to a study done by Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman. In their research of over 50,000 executives they found that "Leaders who ranked at the top 10% in asking for feedback were rated much higher, on average, in overall leadership effectiveness."

Feedback is also linked to employee engagement. In another recent study of over 22,000 leaders, Zenger and Folkman found that there was a correlation between low ratings from direct reports about the leader's ability to give honest feedback and low engagement scores. Conversely, if a leader was rated in the top 10% at giving honest feedback, their reports ranked their engagement in the top 23%.

Business PerformanceImage source: dianegottsman.com

Courtney Seiter, Director of People at Buffer says inviting feedback often, especially from those you trust will help any leader see challenges ahead of time, and you’ll gain experience in responding positively to feedback. She suggests beginning with open-ended questions for those who know you well and can speak with confidence about your work. Here are some great example questions:

- If you had to make two suggestions for improving my work, what would they be?

- How could I handle my projects more effectively?

- What could I do to make your job easier?

- How could I do a better job of following through on commitments?

- If you were in my position, what would you do to show people more appreciation?

- When do I need to involve other people in my decisions?

- How could I do a better job of prioritising my activities?

Overcoming the Fear of Giving and Receiving Feedback

One of the roadblocks of an open feedback culture is fear. When team members are fearful of what type of reaction they might receive if they say what they see, they are less likely to share openly – especially with their superiors.

Business PerformanceImage source: applicantstack.com

Imagine if you have just been asked if you would be open to some feedback. What would your reaction be? Does your stomach tighten? Do you feel fear or anger? Do you anticipate that this feedback will be critical? Are you already feeling defensive and believe that you need to explain, rationalise and justify your actions? These feelings are similar to those felt by many leaders.

Many managers I know think they are open to feedback. They often tell employees that I had an open-door policy for everyone. Then they get frustrated when they hear backdoor gossip. If they tell employees that they can speak with them, why weren’t they all coming to them directly? The answer is often because of how they are expected to react when others hold opposing views.

Sheila Heen and Douglas Stone in a 2014 issue of Harvard Business Review say... 

“The [feedback] process strikes at the tension between two core human needs — the need to learn and grow, and the need to be accepted just the way you are."

Providing Feedback isn’t Solely the Team Leader’s Responsibility

According to Mary Shapiro, who teaches organizational behavior at Simmons College and is the author of the HBR Guide to Leading Teams, leaders can’t be the only one holding everyone accountable because they can’t possibly observe everything that’s going on. If the boss is the only one praising or critiquing, group dynamics suffer. “You want to give everyone the opportunity to say their piece,” she says. “Your job as a manager is to ensure that team members are “providing regular constructive feedback,” says Roger Schwarz, an organizational psychologist and the author of Smart Leaders, Smarter Teams. “There needs to be an expectation within the team that this is a shared leadership responsibility,” he says.

How to Give and Receive Feedback

Giving and receiving feedback is a skill and most people are not naturally good at it, says Shapiro. “One of your goals is to develop your team’s capacity to give feedback and help people get used to articulating how they feel the team is doing.” Take baby steps. At the second or third check-in, ask the group general questions such as, “On a scale of one to five, how well is the team sharing the workload? What needs to change?”

Business PerformanceImage source: lutz.us

Courtney Seiter, Director of People at Buffer suggests the 7 Criteria for Effective Feedback are:

- The feedback provider is credible in the eyes of the feedback recipient

- The feedback provider is trusted by the feedback recipient

- The feedback is conveyed with good intentions

- The timing and the circumstances of giving the feedback are appropriate

- The feedback is given in an interactive manner

- The feedback message is clear

- The feedback is helpful to recipient

Final Tips of Giving & Receiving Feedback

Do:

- Make sure your team understands that feedback is a shared leadership responsibility

- Schedule routine check-in meetings where you encourage feedback

- Keep the tone positive by encouraging team members to say what they appreciate about others’ contributions

- Ask questions to get feedback on your feedback

Business PerformanceImage source: kuzabiashara.co.ke

Don’t:

- Start meetings with your own feedback for the team — allow everyone else to first express how they think they’re doing

- Shy away from performance issues — address them openly with the group

- Get in the middle of personality conflicts — help facilitate difficult conversations

- Don’t assume you’re always right

Good luck in your journey in building a safe, feedback rich environment with your teams! - Victor Burrill

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The Gender Gap in Vietnam is Narrower Than You Might Think

By: Molly Headley

2017 was a year of revolution for women across the world. Massive women’s marches were organised in international cities to bring light to the injustices that still face the female gender today. Social media has kept the flame burning by creating popular hashtags including actress Emma Watson’s #HeforShe male feminist tag, the #YesAllWomen flag where women disclosed stories of everyday sexism and now the #MeToo hashtag where women are talking about sexual harassment and assault in the workplace. #tòasoạnsạch, meaning "clean newsroom," is the hashtag specific to Vietnam that was created in response to sexual harassment and abuse of Vietnamese news media employees.

In Vietnam as in other countries subjects about women’s roles in society and whether there is gender equality in the workplace are trending.

For good reason. Women are a force to be reckoned with in business.

A 2017 study by World Bank-Goldman Sachs shows that microenterprises—small businesses with no more than six employees, such as market shops, street food stalls—are the majority of female-run businesses in Vietnam, coming in at 57 percent.

A surprising report by Grant-Thorton Vietnam, which was presented in March at the event “Women in Business Strive for Excellence”, put on by the British Business Group Vietnam (BBGV), revealed that Vietnam offers women much more egality in the workforce than other neighbouring Asian countries. Ho Ngoc Anh, events and marketing manager for BBGV, was part of the team that organised the event. The panel included some of the top female leaders in Vietnam like Truc Nguyen, CFO of HSBC Vietnam and Tran Thi Thanh Mai, managing director of marketing agency Kantar TNS.

Women owned businessesImage source: pcworld.com.vn

Ho said that one of the most interesting topics discussed was about the current gender balance in the workplace. Out of two equal candidates for a job—one male, one female—who would be more likely to be hired, the women leaders were asked. Almost all of the female respondents surprised the audience by saying it would be the woman.

“Confucius beliefs present in the Vietnamese culture have pushed men forward in the past”, Ho said. “Luckily, Vietnam has been trying to escape the Chinese way of thinking and has also been affected by French culture.” Important female figures such as the French suffragettes in the early 1900’s helped spur the feminist movement worldwide.

“We’ve become more and more open to opportunities for the ladies in the community. We also have very inspiring women, ambassadors in the United Nations, powerful women in business and female war heroes that stood up for their families”, Ho said.

Moreover, a survey in the report asked male and female employees in companies in Malaysia, Singapore and Vietnam whether their companies had made progress in the last one to three years in terms of gender diversity. Respondents reported that 87 percent of men and 84 percent of women in Vietnam said their firms had become more inclusive compared to only 43 percent of women and 82 percent men in Singapore. In Malaysia, 54 percent of women and 79 percent of men reported their firm was progressing in terms of diversity.

From a jack hammer-wielding female emerging from a pit in a construction zone to women holding top roles in the government, such as Dang Thi Ngoc Thinh, who is currently serving as Vice President of Vietnam, women are present in every sector and at every level of business.

Women owned businessesImage source: mfa.go.th

75 percent of businesses in Vietnam have at least one woman in a senior management role and 25 percent are CEOs, these numbers are some of the highest in Southeast Asia.

Ho feels that there is still work to be done to make sure that women are getting paid equally for their work but the current climate is largely positive.

A Delicate Balance

Esther Lam is the co-owner and designer of Esther Lam Lingerie. The creations showcased on Lam’s website feature female models in ethereal lace held up by structured boning, the lingerie’s underwire skeleton. Lingerie is a distinctly female-oriented business but it is also one in which gender roles can be a topic of discussion, simply because women’s undergarments are fetishised and are said to be made for the male taste.

But Lam said she created her line out of “the desire for all girls to pamper their skin.” It is a brand for women created by women, and there in lies the strength.

Women owned businessesImage source: Esther Lam Lingerie

Lam believes sexism still exists in Vietnam because of the deep-seated traditions in the country. “There are surely cultural sensitivities about female identity, and Vietnamese women need to be more decisive but reasonable, and have intelligent methods of solving problems.”

When asked what challenges women face as business owners in Vietnam, Lam responded that “A woman has more roles to finish than just business ones. She has to learn how to harmonize with all roles in her life, or quit almost all to fulfil her dream.”

A Woman’s Place in the Home is Building It

Fong-Chan Paw Zeuthen’s design work is as complicated as she is—both strong and approachable, modern and nostalgic, Scandinavian and Asian. Zeuthen was born in Thailand and was then adopted by Danish parents; a translation error during the adoption made her name have a Chinese edge to it.

When asked whether she had ever considered changing her name, Zeuthen laughed. “No”, she said. She said she likes to walk into a room and not be what people expect her to be. Sometimes when she meets with major real estate developers, she’ll come into a meeting, the only woman surrounded by 20 men. She knows that often they’re expecting to meet with a Chinese man or even a white Dane but when an Asian woman appears unanticipated, Zeuthen said the surprise can be powerful.

This unpredictability is part of the approach that Zeuthen has used to rise up in a typically androcentric profession, a métier heavy in men: architecture and design.

Women owned businessesImage source: KAZE

Zeuthen came to Vietnam 16 years ago for a job as a furniture designer. Eight years later she began her own interior design and architecture business, KAZE. Since then Zeuthen has turned KAZE into a top design firm in Vietnam. Given the size and visibility of projects—from the Vinpearl Ha Thinh and Marriott Resort and Spa Hoi An to offices and private residences—, you’ve likely seen Zeuthen’s work before.

Women owned businessesImage source: fixi.vn

Zeuthen said that she owes a certain amount of her success to Vietnam itself. It is one of the few countries in Asia where women consistently hold the same jobs as men. Zeuthen opined that male and female roles interchange easily, more so than in other Asian countries, and perhaps that is because of Vietnamese history.

There has been a high presence of female fighters and workers in Vietnam’s past. From the Hai Ba Trung sisters, revolutionaries who led the people to take down the Eastern Han Dynasty to Nguyen Thi Dinh, the first female general in the Vietnamese People’s Army, the bravery of women in Vietnam has been well-documented. However, the modern boardroom is a different beast and both the women on the BBGV panel and Zeuthen mentioned that today the number one thing holding women back in business is their confidence.

“Women in business in Vietnam, and everywhere else in the world, need self-confidence to build up trust. Women need to start asking for what they want”, Zeuthen said.

Women owned businessesImage source: wordpress.com

For example, Zeuthen said that men come to talk to her about salary and they walk in expecting a high number but they’ll negotiate. Whereas women “are not ready to fight for it. If they don’t get the salary they want from the beginning they walk away rather than fighting.”

Gender Equality, a Work in Progress

In many ways Vietnam is ahead of the curve in terms of gender equality in the workplace. One clear example is in the area of paid maternity leave.

Female workers in Vietnam are able to claim up to 6 months of full-pay leave through the national insurance system. The father is allowed 5 days paternity leave.

A typical allowance from other countries may be just 12 weeks or less of unpaid leave. “[Vietnam] is the most generous [country] for paid maternity leave in the region, and even in the world”, VN Express wrote in their 2017 coverage on the issue.

Vietnam, like most places in the world, is still a work-in-progress regarding women’s rights. However, women are out there, at the top, already moving the conversation forward.

Video source: UN Women Asia and the Pacific

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How Mobile Apps Have Forever Changed the World of Digital Marketing

By: Paul Espinas and Tom Hitz

“The Mobile app market is expected to grow 270 percentfrom USD70 billion in 2015 to USD189 billion by 2020,” according to App Annie, an app data and insights company in San Francisco, California.

Mobile apps are growing at an unbelievable rate in large part because of the ‘digitalisation phase’ we are currently witnessing. What is digitalisation? Digitalisation refers to the conversion of analogue systems and information into a digital format. Mobile phones are a tool used by more than 75 percent of the world’s population, they help us to communicate, store information and complete daily tasks that are crucial to most people’s lives. The mobile app industry is at the forefront of this digitalisation era.

mobile appsImage source: mobilemarketingmagazine.com

Here is an example to provide an understanding of the process of digitalisation and in particular a mobile application. 10 years ago if you wanted to hail a taxi or organise a ride, you would call the taxi company or stand on the side of the road or at taxi stands and physically wave a taxi down. Now we have companies like Uber and Grab who have a developed a mobile phone application that has digitalised and therefore simplified this process. And not only simplifying the process, ride-sharing apps now provide everyday people with a driver’s license and a car the ability to earn money as a driver. In this example, the digitalisation occurring has not only simplified the existing process but has become an added benefit as well.

mobile appsImage source: mitagency.com

Mobile Marketing Trends 2018 for Apps and Advertising

Whether we are at work, on holiday or at home, every element of our lives is beginning to involve our mobile phones. Mobile app stores allow businesses to utilise the existing hardware that mobile owners possess and implement their solution or software through a simple download.

Vietnam has a total population of 95.6 million people. Out of that number, 73 percent use a mobile phone and there are 50 million people currently active on social media. This makes Facebook ads the most effective digital advertising platform in terms of potential reach.

mobile appsImage source: medium.com

According to market research sources such as eMarketer and IAB, USD78 million was spent on mobile ads, accounting for 36.6 percent of Vietnam’s total spending on digital ads. The presence of mobile phones within society will continue to rise as phones continue to make the transition from a communication device to a personal assistant tool. As these numbers increase, so too will the number of potential applications and opportunities for advertising.

Mobile Apps Reinvent Digital Marketing

Traditional advertising methods rely strictly on strategies such as placement and timing. For example, a television commercial that is aimed at a mature market will be placed amidst a news program displayed between 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Mobile phone applications are a new territory for advertising campaigns and they call for an updated approach. Mobile phones are available for use 24/7, which allows for consistent and efficient advertising designed to align with the specific wants and needs of the audience.

mobile appsImage source: bharatsoftwares.com

Machine learning plays a big role in this alignment. Mobile apps have the ability to collect data based on user behaviour. If I spend my time researching yoga and where to find yoga studios, the application itself will begin to notice these trends and you will likely begin to notice ads in your newsfeed relating to yoga.

As mobile phones continue to become more prominent and useful in all areas of life, the potential for effective and personalised advertisement is rising at an enormous rate.

Banner Image source: vinutnaa.com


Creating a Company in Vietnam

By: Keely Burkey and Jonas van Binsberg

What brought you to Vietnam?

I consider myself a product of the time and the places I grew up in. Born and raised in the Netherlands, graduated and started visiting Southeast Asia just before the financial crisis, in 2006. When the investment bank I was working for in the Netherlands started to run into difficulties at the end of 2007 and in 2008, I had heard of this large Vietnamese company that received support and relationships from international banks such as HSBC and Deutsche Bank. The owner and founder became known to me through the parents of my ex-girlfriend who was living in Australia at the time. We got introduced to each other, and he offered me a job. After that, I joined the export team of a multinational Dutch company responsible for the sales and trade of raw materials and ingredients of several countries in Southeast Asia. About 10 months into the job, this company also started to reorganise. I decided to stay in Vietnam because I was just engaged to my fiancee and strongly felt my time in Vietnam was not finished yet.

What is important when doing business in Vietnam? How does it differ from your experiences in Europe?

First of all, to pay attention to the people, to the relationships. In Germany, in Switzerland we would give a powerpoint presentation with four or five reasons why they should buy our product. Here, it’s all about who you are, where you are from, your family background, and then after that maybe the business things. Here the relationship comes before the transaction.

entrepreneurshipImage source: dbav.org.vn

Do you feel that foreign businesspeople are at a disadvantage here because they don’t share the same culture?

Well, language is one thing. The system is another thing. So, you have a slight disadvantage if you don’t know the language, but you can bring in good local people to work with you. You can have translators, you can have assistants. If you’re looking at the system, I think it’s getting a lot better. Where you might think people would be disadvantaged as a foreigner, Vietnam has already done all the reforms.

In the past few years a number of large international chains have entered Vietnam’s marketplace. Do you think these will hinder local growth, or create unreasonable competition for local companies?

I think local businesses still have a unique chance. They can get local support and they can also develop well because they are local. The local consumer is also buying local, I think. You see that more and more. You see a lot of people are very open to trying new things. You see a new restaurant to try. But I think in the long term, people will be more conscious about buying local products, and the government has already campaigned for a while now about Vietnamese people building local brands and things like that.

What are some of the biggest challenges you've encountered since doing business in Vietnam? What advice would you give people to avoid these obstacles?

In terms of life and investment advice, I would say: know your priorities and know your limits. Time is probably our most valuable asset. How we spend our time can say a lot about us. In the past, I often thought in terms of sacrifice. Sacrifice time for business, sacrifice money and give priority to the happiness of the family or the wife. But this is not right thinking. Right living is a life which is in balance. We intentionally choose to spend time with our loved ones; and we cultivate relationships, healthy habits, healthy living. Our priorities become visible through our daily choices. And what we can do should be within our limits. Unrealistic expectations or behaviour and risk which is beyond limits is dangerous and not a sustainable way of living and working.

What is Saigon Startups? Why did you create this company? 

I have noticed from my own experience, and from my friends here that we, start-up companies, small and medium-sized companies, all need the same things: product development, design, sales and marketing, bookkeeping and other services. The idea of Saigon Startups is sharing of resources, knowledge, experiences between entrepreneurs and companies. The idea is that, things that I have overcome already, or that I know already, can help you to grow your business faster. Saigon Startups is going to be a network of small and medium-sized companies, some invested by myself, some invested through friends or through fund investors. Together sharing information and targeting the same things: sustainable growth, good business, stability, health, wealth, happiness and profit in Vietnam.

entrepreneurshipImage source: media.baodautu.vn

Right now HCMC is seeing a surge in start-ups. Do you think these companies will create competition that will ultimately hinder expansion? Or is there enough room in the market for everyone?

It is a normal part of market growth, company growth and country development. Competition enhances performance and productivity. One thing that I would like to share is that each person and each business is unique. We do not have to copy or emulate one another. We have to find the one thing that ‘only I can do’, the one ‘calling’ that life has for us, our ‘passion’. Once we find that, there is no competition. There is only ‘doing what you love’ and other people sharing the same mission.

What sorts of start-ups are you seeing being developed at the moment? Which start-ups tend to be successful in Vietnam's business environment?

A lot of people are focused on technology start-ups. My personal interest is still mostly old-fashioned business such as manufacturing of agricultural products, healthcare products, things like that, but then combining it with and/or applying the modern tools available such as online marketing, online shopping or mobile phone apps. I think a lot of different types of start-ups can be successful in Vietnam. The key issues which I think are important are: long-term commitment of the team, financial pressure, great innovation... In my opinion, often things go wrong here when people change. No money or borrowed money, try for three to six months but then give up. An entrepreneur needs to have to ability to create, to have a dream, to create a vision, to create a product. If finance, commitment and creation skills are lacking, it’s going to be much harder for a start-up business to be successful.

entrepreneurshipImage source: wellesley.edu

Banner Image source: knowstartup.com


Marketing in Vietnam’s Digital Age

By: Keely Burkey and Paul Espinas

A lot of what you do focuses on the digital sphere. Are there still opportunities to market successfully on non-digital platforms?

For me, marketing is marketing. Online and offline are just means or platforms for me. At the end of the day, a brand is all about a promise and performance. And marketing's job is to make that promise so appealing that customers engage with the brand. With regards to whether using solely online or offline or a hybrid of the two, again it's about the product, the market and, of course, the resources the marketing team has. Many marketers, I guess, will relate to the fact that we don't have unlimited resources. So one of the key skills for a senior marketer is to be able to identify which channels or platforms will best serve their brand goals. I believe that businesses who are following a B2B model lean towards more offline marketing investment like events and activations where they can directly have a person-to-person touchpoint with the audience. But then again, as I said, it really depends on the product, market and budget, among many other things.

digital marketingImage source: scontent.fsgn8-1.fna.fbcdn.net

Are there any digital technologies currently being developed that you're excited to market with? How do you think digital marketing will change in the next year or two?

Digital technologies on virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) is what I'm really excited about. I think it's a completely different league, although challenges on the hardware side might limit mass access of a full-on VR experience. Big players like Apple are investing on mixed reality (MR) and AR, so I believe the next trend of marketing campaigns will be in this field. Here in Vietnam, however, there are still a lot of opportunities untapped in terms of the possibilities on video ads and the mobile ecosystem.

How do you communicate effectively with a millennial audience? What do they want to hear, and what pushes them away?

Communicating to millennials for me is all about a conversational approach. This I believe is the impact of more personal screens like our mobile phones and laptops, which this generation is accustomed to. Hence, we call them the digital natives. We say in marketing that the type of content we publish will also depend on the type of screen it will be placed on. Less personal skills like billboards or digital out-of-home (OOH) placements, which use more "announcement" type of content, while personal screens like our mobile phones use a more conversational approach. Millennials have a "Me, Me, Me" approach to the way they behave in the online ecosystem. Hence the birth of selfie and all those other apps and product features showcasing none other than "ME". This I believe translates to an approach in content writing where the reader, millennials in this case, can immediately relate to the subject. They have short attention spans and it gets shorter every year. So what they see, hear and experience in the first five seconds is crucial.

digital marketingImage source: pprww.com

The news is now talking about Generation Z, the younger generation after millennials. How does this younger generation differ from millennials in terms of optimal marketing strategies?

Generation Z is a target market for me, that will materialise a 100 percent digital-only funnel. This generation is so used to using and engaging through gadgets that the need for a phone call or a meeting with a sales rep won't be needed as much as with previous generations. This, however, poses a great challenge not only to marketers but product owners on how to make their websites or apps at their optimal level of UX/UI [user interface/user experience]. This also implies that marketers need to be, more than ever, digital savvy.

Engagement is a big issue in digital marketing. What incentives (emotional or physical) are necessary to drive up engagement, and how does this potentially translate to ROI?

So in my previous answers, I tapped product, placement, price... I guess this question falls under promotion. So we completed the basic 4Ps. Not the pizza! Promotion is part of the framing strategy in marketing. A campaign may or may not have it; it depends on how it will, as you said, engage users. Now there are different levels of engagement. One of the most basic and frequently used interpretation of this is Social Media Engagement, because Facebook labelled it as such and it is easily trackable. Engagement can also be a simple ad click by your audience or it can be an actual conversation you had with the audience on the forum discussion panel. So it varies. What's important is a positive touchpoint between the audience and the brand. And again, with or without incentives or promotions. Big brands like LV, Ferrari and all these top tier brands never use discounts as a promotion strategy, for example, because it goes against their brand positioning. Group buying sites, for example, like NhomMua or HotDeal use it on a regular basis because they use low prices to initiate sales. As to how engagement converts into an actual ROI, I suggest that brands should build a proper Funnel. From awareness to revenue and to repeat purchases. And this is not only a marketing job—sales and other senior leaders should be involved in this process.

digital marketingImage source: fangdigital.com

Your biggest advice for anyone trying to get into the digital marketing game?

For those folks wanting a career in digital marketing: don't rely on what's taught at school. This industry is very exciting but whatever we do today can be completely irrelevant tomorrow as technology and user behaviour change so quickly. Having said that, the possibilities of discovering and pioneering new things in this field are massive. Don't try to do what's already done. The rapid changes in the industry also mean opportunities for new bloods and the old to create and innovate new ways of communicating brand promise to your audience, be it digital or on another platform.

Banner Image source: culturetech.co


Guide to Living and Working in Paris as an Expat

By: City Pass Guide

Let’s admit it; Paris is one of the world’s most exciting places to live. You will never run out of things to do in this beautiful city, from exploring its fantastic culture and fashion to enjoying its many scenic places. It can be even better if you work here, given that it’s home to pretty much every big multinational company you can imagine.

Working in Paris

However, as a foreigner, your experience could be different if you do not know the ins and outs of living here. In this post, we highlight some of the critical areas you need to familiarize yourself with for a smoother transition when relocating to Paris for work.

Visa and work permit

Anyone who plans to stay for more than three months needs a French residence permit. It would help if you also got a job before you move, as this makes it easier to obtain a work permit. But that’s not all; you have to register with the government within three months of moving to Paris.

Working in Paris

The new micro-enterprise regime makes things a little easier for those who do not want to be employed. In that case, you can register a small business and be allowed to stay on that basis. A caveat though is that you will need to take a business administration course if you choose to use this route.

Housing

As an expat, you can live in any form of housing, although most people prefer furnished rentals upon arrival. Whichever option you choose, be sure to gather all the necessary details on renting houses and the requirements you must meet.

Nearly all Parisians landlords will ask for proof of income before they allow you to occupy their apartments. Usually, they want to be sure that your income is at least three times the rent amount. Apart from that, most of them will ask for guarantors who are supposed to pay your rent in case you default.

Healthcare

Although France has one of the best healthcare systems globally, expats need to acquire international healthcare insurance to access it. Most people get covered under the State Health Insurance Program, but you need to register with CPAM, the body entrusted with administering national health insurance in the country, to be eligible.

Working in Paris

If you’re like most expats, you will want to look for other alternatives, given that the state health insurance program is generally insufficient. However, should you opt for this route, try to familiarize yourself with the best hospitals in Paris before registering for these plans.

Banking

An expat in Paris can open a bank account as long as their visa and work permits are in order. You need this account in order to be paid by your employers or make business transactions if you are self-employed. You can use it for saving, too, because you need a good financial cushion to live comfortably in this city.

The few crucial documents required to set up a French bank account include your passport, residence permit, and proof of residency. Opening a bank account is a simple process, but you will have to wait for about ten days to get a card and a checkbook.

Language and culture

Since you are moving to a country that does not speak your native language, you must learn French to be able to interact with the locals here. Sure, there are millions of English-speaking people in Paris and other parts of France. But it certainly will prove difficult for you to work, because French is the dominant language in most workplaces, including multinational companies.

Working in Paris

Luckily, French isn’t the most difficult language to learn. Once you are properly settled in Paris, consider looking for a language school and enroll to speed up the process. The best part is that most of these schools allow for flexible schedules, meaning you can learn at your own time and pace. There are plenty of online classes too.

Exploring Paris

Your life as an expat in Paris should not be limited to your workplace and apartment alone. Create time to explore your new environment and see what it has to offer. For example, you can use your weekends and other free time to visit suburbs on the city's outskirts to learn about what life is like there. Also, there are hundreds of attractions in this city, it would take you months to exhaust all of them!

Working in Paris

Conclusion

Living in Paris as an expat can be enjoyable if you know how to go about it. Treat this as an opportunity to enjoy a new culture and interact with different people. There is no limit to what you can do in the City of Love.


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