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SAIGON INSPIRATION HEALTH HOSPITALS WHAT HOSPITAL SHOULD I GO TO IN SAIGON ?

 

Our Healthcare Experts in Ho Chi Minh City

On the left: Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong, Chief Medical Officer of Victoria Healthcare as well as a specialist in gastroenterology and hepatology
In the center: Dr. Jean-Marcel Guillon, Legal Representative, and CEO of FV Hospital
On the right: Dr. Nicolas Lagüe, Medical Director – General and Tropical Medicine – CMI (Centre Médical International)

 

Life is sweet in Ho Chi Minh City until something happens like an illness or an emergency that throws us into a panic. What hospital to go to? What doctor should I see? How can I pay for this?

 

Rather than jumping onto the ex-pat forums to try to find answers to these hard questions, we asked these three experts to weigh in on where to go and what to do when every moment counts.

 

The Best Local and International Hospitals in Saigon for Emergencies

Where Do I Go if I Have an Accident (Motorbike or Other) in Saigon?

FV Hospital; Cho Ray or Vinmec – Dr Nicolas Lagüe

FV Hospital – Dr Jean-Marcel Guillon

The short answer is that you should go to the hospital that is closest to you in the event of an emergency and let them refer you if need be. – Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong

 

Where Do I Go if I Have Dengue Fever, Malaria, or another Tropical Disease in Saigon?

For hospitalizations: FVH; Cho Ray; Vinmec; Hospital of Medicine and Pharmacy University.

For consultations: CMI; FMP (Family Medical Practice); Raffles – Dr Nicolas Lagüe

FV Hospital – Dr Jean-Marcel Guillon

Go to a clinic nearby your home if it is out-patient. However, if you need to be hospitalized Vinmec in District 1 or FV in District 7 have good services. – Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong

 

Where Do I Go if I Need Surgery in Saigon?

It depends on the type of surgery but FVH, Hospital of Medicine, and Pharmacy University are good choices – Dr. Nicolas Lagüe

FV Hospital – Dr Jean-Marcel Guillon

Medical University; FV; VinMec International Hospital are all good for that. Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong

*Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong also noted that in the case of stroke, patients should go to 115 Hospital or any other hospital nearby. Patients must have Embo Thrombosis therapy within four to six hours.

 

The Best Local and International Hospitals in Saigon for Chronic Illnesses

Where Do I Go if I Have Heart Disease in Saigon?

Heart Institute (D10); Cardiology Hospital Tam Duc (D10); FVH (D10, they have an interventional room for a few months); Vinmec hospital – Dr. Nicolas Lagüe

FV Hospital – Dr Jean-Marcel Guillon

For Hypertension, you should find a doctor near your home to monitor you regularly. In the case of a heart attack, the University Medical Hospital can do emergency assistance. Victoria Healthcare has a CT scan for heart attacks and can do an emergency assist but does not deal with embolism. FMP in D1 and Thu Duc City (D2) do not have ECG machines, so they cannot diagnose a heart attack. If the patient needs to be admitted, they can go to Medical University or Tam Duc Cardiology Hospital because they can do a cardiac catheterization there. – Dr Nguyen Vinh Tuong

 

Where Do I Go if I Have Diabetes in Saigon?

FVH; Cho Ray; Hospital of Medicine and Pharmacy University – Dr Nicolas Lagüe

FV Hospital – Dr Jean-Marcel Guillon

Any Clinic of international standards. – Dr Nguyen Vinh Tuong

 

The Best Local and International Hospitals in Saigon for Diagnostic Medicine

Where Do I Go if I Need an MRI in Saigon?

I recommend Dr. Pierre Jaillot at FVH for a closed MRI or Vinmec has two open MRI machines – Dr. Nicolas Lagüe

FV Hospital – Dr Jean-Marcel Guillon

It depends on the case. For example, for pediatrics sedation is necessary to do an MRI. Pediatrics Hospitals 1 and 2 are good choices. Vietnam Singapore Clinic on Nguyen Thi Minh Khai has an MRI machine for adult patients in D1. – Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong

 

Where Do I Go if I Need Internal Medicine in Saigon?

FVH; FMP; CMI for some cases. – Dr. Nicolas Lagüe

FV Hospital – Dr Jean-Marcel Guillon

Victoria Healthcare. I am the GI specialist there. – Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong

 

The Best Local and International Hospitals in Saigon for Children and Women’s Health

Where do I go for Pediatrics in Saigon?

For Consultations: CMI; FMP/ For Hospitalisations or other: FVH; Cho Ray; VinMec. – Dr. Nicolas Lagüe

FV Hospital – Dr. Jean-Marcel Guillon

For Consultations: Victoria Healthcare / For Hospitalisations or other: FV; VinMec; City Children’s Hospital – Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong

 

Where do I go for Gynecology and Maternity in Saigon?

Gynecology: CMI; FVH; Hanh Phuc Hospital / Pregnancy: Hanh Phuc Hospital; CMI; FVH – Dr. Nicolas Lagüe

FV Hospital – Dr Jean-Marcel Guillon

Gynecology: Victoria Healthcare / Maternity: Hanh Phuc; International OB-GY hospital; Từ Dũ Hospital –Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong

 

The Best Local and International Hospitals in Saigon for Dental and Dermatology

Where do I go for Dermatology in Saigon?

FVH; Stanford Skin Center – Dr. Nicolas Lagüe

FV Hospital – Dr Jean-Marcel Guillon

Victoria Healthcare – Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong

 

Where do I go for Plastic or Reconstructive Surgery?

FVH – Dr. Nicolas Lagüe

FVH- Dr Jean-Marcel Guillon

Not much experience but FVH is a good choice. –Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong

 

Where do I go for Dental services in Saigon?

Starlight; Maple Healthcare (Australian clinic); FVH- Dr. Nicolas Lagüe

FVH- Dr. Jean-Marcel Guillon

West Coast for dental; Victoria Healthcare also does dental surgery. – Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong

 

Frequently Asked Questions about How to Get Good Healthcare in Saigon as a Foreigner

When would you advise a patient to seek care outside of Vietnam?

When we cannot treat the disease in Vietnam. The question is too large. It depends on the disease. In the case of cancer, FV Hospital is a good place to start. But the patient might need a medevac or to go back to their country of origin. – Dr. Nicolas Lagüe

On rare occasions, we do refer patients to Singapore for certain eye conditions that require complex surgery that we cannot perform at FV. Some very high-risk pregnancies are also referred to Singapore (especially when surgery on the newborn is foreseen). – Dr Jean-Marcel Guillon

We don’t usually refer patients outside of Vietnam if it is an emergency. We will admit the patient and make a detailed review then decide if we need to refer the patient elsewhere. Some patients require a very high standard of service. It is not for the quality of treatment but for the service that they request to go overseas. Sometimes I send my patients with early cancer overseas for minimally invasive treatment. Usually, I refer them to the Park Group in Singapore or National University Medical (NUH) in Singapore. I worked in Singapore before I came to Vietnam, so usually, I refer my patients to a specific doctor, not to a hospital. – Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong

 

What advice would you give to foreigners seeking healthcare in Vietnam?

Check on internet forums for advice. Check on consulate websites for recommendations. – Dr. Nicolas Lagüe

Honestly, if they want quality and serenity they should come to FV – Dr. Jean-Marcel Guillon

First, make sure they have insurance that covers outpatient. Second, they should choose a clinic that they know and try to find a regular family doctor that can give them advice whenever something happens. It is important to have someone that you can call if you need advice and a referral. – Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong

 

What hospitals are only open to Vietnamese nationals (not foreigners)?

The new policy is to start opening departments to foreigners. We should see more Vietnamese hospitals such as Cho Ray, Hospital of Medicine and Pharmacy University, Heart Institute, and Hospital Tam Duc, completely opening their doors to foreigners soon. – Dr. Nicolas Lagüe

I don’t know of any hospital that is restricted to Vietnamese. – Dr Jean-Marcel Guillon

Every district has its own hospital called a District hospital and there they don’t like to take in foreigners because they have limited space and experience. In an emergency, they will stabilize the foreign patient and then refer them to another hospital. These hospitals are required to receive all patients but then they try to refer foreign patients to another hospital. – Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong

 

What advice would you give to foreigners seeking healthcare in Vietnam?

Check on internet forums for advice. Check on consulate websites for recommendations. – Dr. Nicolas Lagüe

Honestly, if they want quality and serenity they should come to FV – Dr. Jean-Marcel Guillon

First, make sure they have insurance that covers outpatient. Second, they should choose a clinic that they know and try to find a regular family doctor that can give them advice whenever something happens. It is important to have someone that you can call if you need advice and a referral. – Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong

 

What hospitals can foreigners go to that are less expensive than an international hospital?

Cho Ray (but not always); Hospital of Medicine and Pharmacy University – Dr. Nicolas Lagüe

All public hospitals are cheaper than private ones. Second-tier hospitals like Hoan My or Anh Sinh are cheaper than first-tier hospitals like FV, VinMec, or City International. – Dr Jean-Marcel Guillon

Saigon International Ob-Gyn Hospital is actually a local hospital but of very high quality; Van Hanh Hospital is good and is a good choice for foreigners. Some new hospitals have opened such as Hospital Tan Hung, which has quite a big facility in D7. Often the problem with foreigners going to local hospitals is that the doctors can’t speak much English. The facilities are good but it’s easier if you can speak Vietnamese. – Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong.

 

What advice would you give to foreigners seeking healthcare in Vietnam?

Check on internet forums for advice. Check on consulate websites for recommendations. – Dr. Nicolas Lagüe

They should come to FV – Dr. Jean-Marcel Guillon

First, make sure they have insurance that covers outpatient. Second, they should choose a clinic that they know and try to find a regular family doctor that can give them advice whenever something happens. It is important to have someone that you can call if you need advice and a referral. – Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong

 

What hospitals are only open to Vietnamese nationals (not foreigners)?

The new policy is to start opening departments to foreigners. We should see more Vietnamese hospitals such as Cho Ray, Hospital of Medicine and Pharmacy University, Heart Institute, and Hospital Tam Duc, completely opening their doors to foreigners soon. – Dr. Nicolas Lagüe

I don’t know of any hospital that is restricted to Vietnamese. – Dr Jean-Marcel Guillon

Every district has its own hospital called a District hospital and there they don’t like to take in foreigners because they have limited space and experience. In an emergency, they will stabilize the foreign patient and then refer them to another hospital. These hospitals are required to receive all patients but then they try to refer foreign patients to another hospital. – Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong.

 

What hospitals can foreigners go to that are less expensive than an international hospital?

Cho Ray (but not always); Hospital of Medicine and Pharmacy University – Dr. Nicolas Lagüe

All public hospitals are cheaper than private ones. Second-tier hospitals like Hoan My or Anh Sinh are cheaper than first-tier hospitals like FV, VinMec, or City International. – Dr Jean-Marcel Guillon

Saigon International Ob-Gyn Hospital is actually a local hospital but of very high quality; Van Hanh Hospital is good and is a good choice for foreigners. Some new hospitals have opened such as Hospital Tan Hung, which has quite a big facility in D7. Often the problem with foreigners going to local hospitals is that the doctors can’t speak much English. The facilities are good but it’s easier if you can speak Vietnamese. – Dr. Nguyen Vinh Tuong

 

Ho Chi Minh City Emergency Numbers

Ho Chi Minh City Emergency Numbers

Police

113

Fire

114

Ambulance

115

 

The Ultimate Guide to Clinics & Hospitals in Ho Chi Minh City

 

District 1 and Binh Thanh International Clinics and Hospitals in Ho Chi Minh City

Columbia Asia International Clinic – Saigon

8 Alexandre De Rhodes, Ben Nghe, District 1, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3823 8888

7:30 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Columbia Asiana Gia Dinh Clinic

1 No Trang Long, Binh Thanh District, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3803 0678

Open 24 hours

HANH PHUC International Medical Building

97 Nguyen Thi Minh Khai St, District 1, HCMC, Vietnam

Tel: 1900 6765 or

+84 28 3925 9797

Mon-Fri: 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat: 8 a.m.-12 p.m.

HCMC Family Medical Practice

34 Le Duan St., District 1, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3822 7848

Open 24 hours

Stamford Skin Centre

99 Suong Nguyet Anh, District 1, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3925 1990

Mon-Fri: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Sat: 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Sun: Closed

Victoria Healthcare

20-20BIS-22 Dinh Tien Hoang Street, Dakao Ward, District 1, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3910 4545

Hotline: 1900 6576  (after business hours)

Mon-Sat: 7a.m. – 8 p.m.

Sun: 7 a.m. – noon

Vinmec International Hospital

208 Nguyen Huu Canh, Ward 22, Binh Thanh District, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3622 1166

Open 24 hours

Westcoast International Dental Clinic

17-19-21 Ly Tu Trong, District 1, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3825 6999

Mon – Fri: 8:30 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Sat – Sun: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Local Clinics and Hospitals (Minimum English Spoken. Best for patients who speak Vietnamese) in Ho Chi Minh City

City Children’s Hospital 2

14 Ly Tu Trong, Ben Nghe, District 1, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3829 5723

Open 24 hours

Ho Chi Minh City Medicine University Hospital

221B Hoang Van Thu, Ward 8, Phu Nhuan Dostrict, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3844 2756

+84 28 3846 8938

 

Pediatrics Hospital 2

14 Ly Tu Trong St, Ben Nghe Ward, District 1, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3829 8385

Open 24 hours

Saigon General Hospital

125 Le Loi, District 1, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3829 2071

+84 28 3829 1711

7 a.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Saigon International Ob-Gyn Hospital

63 Bui Thi Xuan, District 1, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3925 3619

+84 28 3925 3625

 
 

Thu Duc City (District 2) International Clinics and Hospitals 

Family Medical Practice (FMP)

95 Thao Dien, Thu Duc City, Vietnam

+84 28 3744 2000

Mon – Fri : 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Sat : 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Sun : Closed

Starlight Dental Clinic

24 Thao Dien, Thu Duc City, Vietnam

+84 28 6282 8822

Mon – Sat: 8 a.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Sun: Closed

Victoria Healthcare

37-39 Lương Định Của, P. Bình An, Thu Duc City, Vietnam

+84 28 3910 45457/7: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Westcoast International Dental Clinic

27 Nguyen Ba Lan, Thao Dien, Thu Duc City, Vietnam

+84 28 3519 1777

Mon – Fri: 8:30 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Sat – Sun: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

 

District 3 and Phu Nhuan International Clinics and Hospitals in Ho Chi Minh City

Centre Medical International (CMI)

30 Pham Ngoc Thach, District 3, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3827 2367

+84 28 3827 2366

7:00 a.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Maple Healthcare (Chiropractic, Dental, Skincare)

107B Truong Dinh,Ward 6, District 3, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3930 0498

Mon – Fri: 8 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Sat: 8 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Sun: Closed

Phòng Khám Ung Bướu Vietnam Singapore Clinic

97 Nguyen Thi Minh Khai, Pham Ngu Lao, District 3, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3925 1155

Monday – Saturday

8 a.m. – 10 p.m.

Raffles Medical Ho Chi Minh

167A Nam Ky Khoi Nghia St, District 3, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3824 0777

Open 24 hours

Starlight Dental Clinic

2 Bis International Square , Ward 6, District 3, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3822 6222

Mon – Sat: 8 a.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Sun: Closed

Victoria Healthcare

135A Nguyen Van Troi Street, Phu Nhuan District, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3910 4545

Hotline: 1900 6576 (after business hours)

Mon-Sat: 7a.m. – 8 p.m.

Sun: 7 a.m. – noon

Local Clinics and Hospitals (Minimum English Spoken. Best for patients who speak Vietnamese) in Ho Chi Minh City

An Sinh

10 Tran Huy Lieu, W.12, Phu Nhuan District, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3845 7777

Open 24 hours

Hoan My Saigon Hospital

60-60A Phan Xich Long, W.1, Phu Nhuan District, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3990 2468

Mon – Sat: 7 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Sun: 6:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Traditional Medicine Hospital

179 Nam Ky Khoi Nghia, Ward 7, D.3, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3932 6579

Mon – Fri : 8 a.m. – 11:30 p.m./ 1p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Sun: Closed

 

District 4 and 5 Local Clinics and Hospitals (Minimum English Spoken. Best for patients who speak Vietnamese) in Ho Chi Minh City

An Binh hospital

146 An Binh St., District 5, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3923 4260

Open 24 hours

Cho Ray

201B Nguyen Chi Thanh, District 5, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3855 4137

Open 24 hours

Hospital of Medicine and Pharmacy University

215 – 217 Hong Bang, District 5, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3856 6154

Mon – Fri: 6:30am – 4:30pm

Sat: 6:30am – 11:30am

Sun: Closed

Hospital for Tropical diseases

764 Vo Van Kiet, District 5, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3923 5804

+84 28 3923 8704

Open 24 hours

Mental hospital of Ho Chi Minh City

766 Vo Van Kiet, District 5, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3923 4675

Mo- Fri: 7:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. / 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Sat: 7:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Sun: Closed

Medical University Hospital Campus 2

201 Nguyen Chi Thanh, District 5, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3955 5548

Mon – Fri: 6am – 5pm

Sat: 6am – 12pm

Sun: Closed

Pham Ngoc Thach hospital

120 Hong Bang, District 5, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3855 0207

Open 24 hours

Traditional Medicine Hospital – Branch 2

218K Tran Hung Dao B, District 5, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3950 9891

Mon – Fri: 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Sat: 8 a.m. – 11 a.m.

 

District 7 International Clinics and Hospital in Ho Chi Minh City

Careplus International Clinics (Associate of Singapore Medical Group)

Level 2, Crescent Plaza, 105 Ton Dat Tien street, Phu My Hung, District 7, HCMC, Vietnam

Free Hotline: 1800 6116

Online Booking: www.careplusvn.com

Facebook

Mon – Fri: 8am – 8pm

Sat: 8am – 5pm

Sun: 8am – 12pm (Pediatric services only)

Franco-Vietnamese hospital (FVH)

6 Nguyen Luong Bang St, Tan Phu Ward, District 7, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 5411 3333

Mon – Fri: 8am – 5pm

Sat: 8am – 12pm

Sun: Closed

Victoria Healthcare

Broadway D Building, 152 Nguyen Luong Bang Street, District 7, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3910 4545

Hotline: 1900 6576 (after business hours)

Mon-Sat: 7a.m. – 8 p.m.

Sun: 7 a.m. – noon

Local Clinics and Hospitals (Minimum English Spoken. Best for patients who speak Vietnamese) in Ho Chi Minh City

Cardiology Tam Duc Heart Hospital

4 Nguyen Luong Bang, Tan Phu, District 7, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 5411 0025

Open 24 hours

Hospital Tan Hung

871 Tran Xuan Soan, Tan Hung, D7, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3776 0648

Mon – Fri: 7 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Sat: 7 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Sun: Closed

 

District 10 and Other Districts International Clinics and Hospitals in Ho Chi Minh City

Careplus International Clinics (Associate of Singapore Medical Group)

107 Tan Hai Street, Ward 13, Tan Binh District, HCMC, Vietnam ( Next to Etown)

Free Hotline: 1800 6116

Online Booking: www.careplusvn.com

Facebook

Mon – Fri: 8am – 8pm

Sat: 8am – 5pm

Sun: 8am – 12pm (Pediatric services only)

Local Clinics and Hospitals in Ho Chi Minh City (Minimum English Spoken. Best for patients who speak Vietnamese)

115 People’s Hospital

527 Su Van Hanh, W.12, District 10, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3865 4249

Open 24 hours

Heart Institute

86/4 Thanh Thai, District 10, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3865 1586

Mon – Fri: 7:30am – 6pm

Pediatrics Hospital 1

341 Su Van Hanh St., Ward 10, District 10, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3927 1119

Mon – Fri: 7am – 7:30pm

Thong Nhat hospital

1 Ly Thuong Kiet St., Ward 7, Tan Binh District, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3864 2141

Open 24 hours

Van Hanh Hospital

781/B1 Alley 781 Le Hong Phong, District 10, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3863 2553

Everyday from 7 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. – 5 p.m.

City Children’s Hospital

15 Vo Tran Chi, Tan Kien, Binh Chanh District, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 2253 6688

Open 24 hours

Hanh Phuc

18 Binh Duong Boulevard, Thuan An District, Binh Duong Province

1900 6765 or

+84 28 4363 6068

Open 24 hours

Anh Minh Hospital

15-16 Phan Van Tri, Go Vap district, HCMC, Vietnam

+84 28 3989 4989

7a.m. – 11:30 p.m. and 1 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Citypassguide.com adv

SAIGON INSPIRATION HEALTH HOSPITALS BEST & WORST HOSPITAL STORIES

We asked our fans on social media to come up with best and worst medical related stories. They certainly didn’t disappoint, some of these are quite hilarious. Most are also very informative.

 

Anonymous

Last year I had a motorbike accident and broke my collar bone. My orthopaedic surgeon from Family Medical Practice performed my operation at FV Hospital, and all went well. Of course, as in the U.S. they wanted assurance of payment, and charged my credit card prior to admission for the projected cost of my hospital stay, plus fees associated with my surgery.

 

Steve B

A friend went to a local hospital. Because of insomnia, she got prescribed a strong neuroleptic and a strong antidepressant. Now she has insomnia because of the side effects of these strong drugs, and she’ll need months or even years to lower the use of or stop these medications. I would say, never visit a local hospital unless you have a prior diagnosis.

 

Kevin Wortz

I have been here 10 years. I have had many treatments: a hernia in the groin area repaired (Columbia Asia International Clinic by Dr. Vinh); new lenses in both eyes (had multifocals for 27 years, went to Symphony International Eye Clinic); and a left shoulder supraspinatus tendon reattached (An Sinh Hospital). When I had a left rotator cuff repaired I went to FV Hospital, where the boss wanted me to stay four nights for more money, yet his surgeon said only one night; this op was conducted by Dr. Nguyen Trong Anh, the best orthopaedic guy around). I’ve also just had a malignant growth cut out of my head at Van Hanh Hospital and will have a new left hip soon. I didn’t go to Cho Ray or some of the shitty cattle yards which pretend to be hospitals, but I chose much better, far cheaper hospitals with highly qualified surgeons and specialists. Medical care here, in my experience, has been far better than I have received in the past in Oz.

 

Anonymous

I cannot believe that a hospital would not only be filthy, with no soap or many other necessities, but also have no food. While I was in for pneumonia, I almost starved to death! There was no bedpan, we had to buy one, no bedding, bring your own and wash it yourself. But the best part was when I asked for water. I was told to call my family to bring me some. My family is in New York. The first night the room filled up with (I counted) 32 family members of other patients. They moved in, slept everywhere, yelled all night, got in fights, smoked and were all oblivious to the fact that sick people were trying to get rest! A total nightmare! When I got good and fed up and checked out the attendant rammed my foot with a floor cleaner and cracked my toe. The doctor put on a terrible cast that didn’t fit and had a lumpy bottom I couldn’t stand on and had such sharp edges, it cut my foot open when I tried to walk! I had to have it removed due to pain and bleeding.

 

Charlie Wallace

After getting a confirmation that I probably have appendicitis, I got in a taxi to Columbia hospital on the other side of the city. I slapped the stack of scans and test results down in front of the night staff along with my health insurance card. The receptionist rang the “emergency” number on the back of the card. But the lady on the other end refused to confirm that I will be covered. The total cost would come to some VND75 million (about $3,362). For them to admit me without confirmed insurance cover, they’d need a deposit of VND15 million, an amount I wasn’t even close to having. I didn’t have my passport to use as a deposit either, since I already used it as a deposit with a different hospital in exchange for one of the crucial scans. I grabbed the phone and poured hot liquid contempt down the line. “Look, this is an emergency. My appendix has decided it wants to kill me and doesn’t give a damn about your office hours. If I wait, I could die. Do you understand that?” The night staff wrest the receiver away before I could start swearing, and to their great credit slowly managed to convey the urgency of the situation. At about 4:30 a.m. I finally get the green light, and by 5:30 a.m. I was in a hairnet and operating gown.

 

Arash Rouhani

I went to Ngoc Minh clinic because it was close to my office. Despite not even being here for a year I took on the language challenge and got everything done using Vietnamese. I felt everything was okay!

 

Anonymous

Without insurance, Saigon can be a surprisingly expensive place to get injured. I should know after having three crashes in eight days. The first was an unavoidable collision with a wall after a lunatic motorbike driver swerved me off the road: I bruised my thigh but was otherwise more or less OK. The second was a skin-shredding balancing-act that tore a lot of skin off my sandaled foot. I went to the Centre Medical International (CMI) on Han Thuyen where they cleaned my wounds and gave me professional instruction on how to look after them. The charge of VND800,000 seemed reasonable considering the level of care I received.

 

Third crash: I hit a pothole on the poorly maintained road after the Thu Thiem bridge. I felt like I had broken my leg so decided it was hospital time. Following the advice of various expats, I went to the French-Vietnamese Hospital (FV) in District 7. For around VND3 million they took an x-ray, performed an ultrasound and treated me expertly from start to finish. I couldn’t walk for three weeks or so and were it not for my wife, I would’ve suffered massively. The moral of the story: drive slowly, expect the worst and be married to someone who is willing to bring you supplies like an angel.

 

Citypassguide.com adv

SAIGON INSPIRATION HEALTH HOSPITALS THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO GIVING BIRTH IN SAIGON

 

• Pregnant women can receive prenatal care at any OBGYN in Saigon, though FV Hospital or Hanh Phuc are the most recommended.

• Birth plans are essential for mums who want a natural, medication-free experience

• Getting the birth certificate will likely be the most stressful part of having a baby in Vietnam. We show you how to get it done.

 

My youngest child is nine years old, so all the details of giving birth have blurred a bit with time. However, I do remember that the closer I got to delivery, the more anxious I felt about all the decisions to be made before, during and after labour. As a pregnant woman away from your home country, I can only imagine that these anxieties are compounded. Well, City Pass Guide is here to hopefully set your mind at ease with our Guide to Giving Birth in Saigon.

 

I talked to a few mums and a birthing coach, and first off, let me assure you, there is a lot less to worry about than you might think. Everyone assured me that hospitals in Saigon are quite comparable to the care you would receive in any Western country. The facilities are clean and well equipped. The doctors are often trained in Western schools and adhere to widely accepted standards. Nurses are caring and helpful and many speak adequate English. As with most things in Vietnam, though, there are a few things to be aware of, so let’s get down to specifics.

 

Prenatal Care in Vietnam

You can receive prenatal care at any OBGYN in Saigon, though most people recommend FV Hospital or Hanh Phuc. Patients can expect monthly visits with doctors who are accommodating, friendly and willing to answer all of your questions. In fact, you can have the doctor’s phone number and email to reach her when necessary. You can also expect to have regular ultrasounds and prenatal testing. Prenatal vitamins and folic acid supplements are readily available at hospital pharmacies.

Both hospitals offer birthing classes where you can visit the birthing suites and where the midwives give tips for labour. These classes also focus a bit on hospital policy and procedure, which some new mums didn’t find helpful. For a more holistic approach to birthing, try a class at CMI or with Lactation Counselor and Birth Doula, Nellie Pilisi.

Nellie offers a six-hour class for both parents to attend. She covers breastfeeding, aftercare, partner support and creating a birth plan, among other topics. She is also available for lactation consulting, home visits, hospital advocacy and general support for new mums.

Some of the yoga studios in Saigon offer prenatal and postnatal yoga and fitness classes to help prepare your body for labour. Sivananda Yoga in D1, Mandala Wellness in Thu Duc City (D2), and Yoga Joy Saigon in D7 offer prenatal yoga. Body Shape in Thu Duc City also offers prenatal fitness classes. Additionally, birthing classes, infant first aid and mummy meet-ups are held at Mandala Wellness. Please contact these venues for scheduling and prices, as they are subject to change based on demand.

How to Create a Plan for Giving Birth in Saigon

Most of the mums I spoke to highly recommended that you have a birth plan in place, especially if you want to have a natural, medication-free experience. Stephanie Cantrell, who has given birth to two babies in the last two years in Saigon, has a wonderful blog about giving birth and raising children here.

 

If you’ve spent any amount of time in Saigon, you’ll know it can be difficult for people to diverge from the status quo, so it is helpful if your partner can be your advocate. As Stephanie said, “I think it’s important to have a pushy partner as well as an agreed on and signed off birth plan, if you’re going to really get what you want without constant hassle”. She suggests to be specific about what you want, but also keep it short, no more than one page, so that staff and doctors can take a quick glance.

 

Both Nellie and Stephanie stress that you need to create the birth plan with your partner and discuss the birth plan ahead of time with your doctor and get them to sign off on it a few weeks before your due date. Remember to keep copies of your birth plan during labour and delivery as a reference for staff. Finally, have a plan B, just in case you need to have an emergency procedure or an issue arises with your new baby.

 

If you’d like to get Stephanie Cantell’s first-hand account of giving birth in Saigon, check her blog here.

 

Labour and Delivery in HCMC Hospitals

There are only two choices of hospitals for giving birth for expats, FV Hospital and Hanh Phuc. FV Hospital has more English-speaking nurses; however, many mums still say they had a wonderful experience at Hanh Phuc. You will likely only see the doctor for the final moments of labour. For most of the time, you will be cared for by midwives.

 

If you have a birth plan, you can have many options for delivery, including if and when you receive pain medication; how you want to push; being free to eat, drink, and walk around; and scheduled C-section. Water birth seems to be the only option that is still not available in Saigon. Just remember to have that birth plan handy to remind all the staff of your wishes.

 

Be assured that both facilities have the necessary equipment, training and staff to make your labour as smooth as possible. In the unfortunate event that issues arise, they are also well equipped to take care of you and your baby. Premature births are handled onsite as well.

 

Post Partum Care in Saigon

The midwives in both hospitals are knowledgeable about breastfeeding and aftercare and are available to help you at all hours of the day and night. In most cases, your baby will stay in your room, and either you or your partner will always have eyes on your new bundle of joy. For an additional fee per night, your partner will be provided a cot to sleep on in your private room. Unlike in most Western countries, mums can expect to stay in the hospital for at least three days for a natural birth and up to five days for birth by cesarean.

 

Unless there is an issue, there is no real aftercare once you leave the hospital. However, you can arrange for a midwife or doula to visit you. Additionally, Nelli Pilisi is available for visits, calls and Skype calls.

 

How to Get a Birth Certificate in Vietnam

This will likely be the most stressful part of having a baby in Vietnam. As with dealing with any government agency here, this process will be lengthy and full of paperwork. Unfortunately, laws change quickly and without warning in Vietnam, so don’t be surprised if you encounter some confusion.

 

To make it a bit easier, start the process before the birth. Prepare certified copies of your residency card and whole passports; a legalised, translated and a certified copy of your marriage certificate; and a copy of your landlord registration book.

 

After the birth, you will receive a certified copy of the hospital delivery records. Make several certified copies of this, as you may need these for the passport application and visas. Next, you’ll need an affidavit of nationality from your consulate or embassy. Then, have this legalised, translated and certified.

 

Take all of your original and copied documents as well as an application to the Local Peoples’ Committee. You must go to the one in your residing district. It is very helpful to have a Vietnamese-speaking friend here, as you may need to refill forms or ask questions. If everything is in order, you will be able to pick up your baby’s birth certificate in a few days.

 

Finally, get the birth certificate legalised, then have it translated into your home country’s language, legalised and certified. Now you’re ready to apply for a passport for baby. It is recommended that you do not plan any travel for at least six months after the birth of your child, as this whole process can take anywhere from two weeks to six months.

 

For more detailed information on this process, please refer to Stephanie Cantrell’s blog, “How We Grow: Life with Kids in Vietnam.” You can also find a wealth of information by searching in the Saigon International Families Facebook group.

 

The bottom line: You can do this! Be prepared, do your research, and don’t be afraid to make your wishes known. You and your baby will receive proper medical care. Dealing with the various government offices may be frustrating, but you can get through that, too. Having kids won’t be easy anywhere in the world, but at least in Saigon, you can get a good start on this journey.

 

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SAIGON INSPIRATION HEALTH HOSPITALS FOUR HOSPITALS AND A POSSIBLE FUNERAL

 

Upon waking up one Friday with a vicious headache and a swollen right lymph node, I had no idea what turmoil was going to proceed throughout the next 48 hours as I navigated Vietnam’s bewildering hospital system.  What started as a headache, had, throughout the course of the morning turned into a full body fever. As my temperature grew in intensity, my body was radiating heat, my bones and joints started to feel like they were being broken, and I was slowly drained of all energy.

 

Hospital 1: Benh Vien Benh Nhiet Doi

Knowing that I didn’t have health insurance, the energy nor the Vietnamese skills to tackle this alone, I asked my friend to help me find a suitable hospital. Considering the main problem was clearly a dangerously high fever, we headed to Benh Vien Benh Nhiet Doi, as they specialise in fevers and tropical diseases.

 

As I entered they immediately said that they did not treat foreigners as their facilities were not suitable. However, seeing my current state they proceeded to take my temperature anyhow, which had risen to 41°C. About 20 minutes later a doctor appeared who checked my throat and quickly diagnosed me with tonsillitis. I was then given pills to reduce the fever, and pushed out the door to the next hospital.

 

Hospital 2: The Infamous Cho Ray Emergency Room

I arrived at Cho Ray’s emergency room around 9 p.m. and walked into a frazzled and packed emergency room. They directed me to a spot in the back, where a nurse motioned me over to a bed already occupied by a very sick looking man. As I looked across the scene of the ER, people were getting angry at the long waits. Two men had ripped out their IVs in frustration as blood squirted everywhere. Nurses pushed beds into door frames and other beds, IV lines were hooked and yanked out of place. It was a hospital bed bumper car scene. As one doctor walked past, he noticed me sitting on the edge of the shared bed and informed us that the man beside me had HIV. He advised me that if I wanted to see a doctor I would have to wait in the ER until the morning which was about eight hours away.

Hospital 3: Colombia International

Around 5 a.m. the next day I checked into Colombia International in Phu Nhuan, expecting this to be my last stop. They carried the typical money first or die on the floor attitude. I paid my VND3 million for a bed, a paracetamol drip and then more to talk to the doctor. He took my blood, which was highly infected with bacteria.

 

They told me I had to stay for three nights and that I was looking at surgery when the swelling went down. After three hours they asked me to pay more if I wanted to stay in the bed. After I said I would check out, the doctor got extremely angry, all staff members’ facial expressions changed, and their overall attitude toward me turned sour.

 

I refused to leave at that moment, as the IV I had paid for was not finished. So they adjusted my drip to empty it faster. Upon checkout they charged me again for the bed to compensate for the time it took the IV to empty (which I already paid for). I checked out, still sick, with VND5 million less, and no idea of what to do next.

 

Hospital 4: Van Hanh

In the morning I went to Van Hanh Hospital, and this is where I will go from here on out. I was diagnosed, treated and out of the hospital within an hour. Everyone spoke English, was extremely knowledgeable and treated me with genuine care and concern for my health. The doctor gave me new meds and said if I wasn’t better in two days he would be very surprised.

 

The facility was spotless, traffic was low, English was great, medical technology was modern, and the patient care was exceptional. My fever was back to normal within hours, and I returned two days later for a checkup to find everything was fine, and my health was back on track. My hospital nightmare had finally ended.

 

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SAIGON INSPIRATION HEALTH HOSPITALS HOAN MY SAIGON HOSPITAL

 

Sponsored feature

Hoan My Sai Gon Hospital was started in 1999 as the first private hospital in HCMC, and has since grown to become one of the most significant leaders in privatised healthcare. Hoan My is a one-stop-shop hospital, due to the fact that they have highly qualified specialists in nearly every field, a vast and modernised range of imported medical equipment, and the staffing power to take care of every individual need of each patient.

 

Hoan My Saigon Hospital VIP Package

Hoan My has just recently launched their premiere VIP medical facility on the 11th and 12th floors of their hospital in Phu Nhuan. Encapsulating the concept of a “Hotel Hospital”, this spotless, luxury healthcare unit adheres to international standards while providing ethical and cutting edge treatment for each patient. From the waiting room to the inpatient and outpatient areas, visitors are able to enjoy the comfort of a high-end hotel atmosphere.

 

The lobby has carpeted floors, relaxing leather sofas and HD televisions to keep you occupied as your loved one receives meticulous, expert treatment. The inpatient and outpatient rooms also contain HDTVs, top of the line furnishings, and an ambiance that leaves you feeling calm. In case of immediate assistance, each room is equipped with an electronic call system for your convenience.

 

Unlike most hospitals, where you are relocated to different floors and sometimes even other hospitals for different procedures, the VIP wing is all-inclusive. You will not need to be transferred anywhere and any kind of treatment needed can be delivered on the same floor, saving you the hassle and headache of having to move around.

 

Patients also have the option to set up their appointments online and select the specialist of their choice; scrolling through the online profiles of each doctor gives patients the ability to overview their work experience and credentials. All doctors in the VIP area can speak English and visitors can feel comfort knowing there will not be a communication barrier.

 

Hoan My Saigon Hospital Training and Staff

There are approximately 120 top doctors (many of whom are internationally trained) and 300 nurses currently employed at Hoan My Sai Gon. Doctors must have at least five years of working experience before being considered for employment and all specialists must have a PhD in their field, practical training and great competance in accordance with their degree. Nurses are also required to have a nursing degree or a certificate from nursing school, as well as undergo heavy-handed development courses in international patient Safety Goals.

 

Having proper up-to-date medical technology is the key to providing international quality services, and this is one of the biggest advantages of having treatment at Hoan My Sai Gon. All their medical equipment is 100% imported and no more than four years old. Hoan My Sai Gon also has extensive cardiac and bypass equipment as this department undertakes a large number of patients with heart-related issues. An expert biomedical technology team is brought in to routinely check all equipment each month to ensure its proper function.

 

Hoan My Saigon Hospital Patient Care

Quality patient care is the primary mission of Hoan My Sai Gon. For every one patient there are three staff members to assist each person in need. On average, patients will wait five minutes before they are initially seen by a professional. In lieu of avoiding overcrowding, doctors and nurses arrive before opening hours in order to assist people already waiting. They have also furnished their space with an above average volume of beds in order to keep patients comfortable as they await further treatment.

 

Hoan My Saigon Hospital Quality Control

In order to attain the status of a premiere hospital, CEO Dr. Tram Em has implemented strict and comprehensive protocols that all employees must follow. Each week clinical audits are made; if standards are not met retraining will occur. Patient identification is another standardised process that inherently requires double and triple checking of personal health profiles of each visitor to avoid problems with allergies, bad medications or misdiagnosis. As a result of intuitive strategic management, Hoan My Sai Gon is able to provide complete support to every patient that visits their hospital, and the results clearly speak for themselves.

 

60-60A Phan Xich Long, Phu Nhuan District, HCMC, Vietnam /  +84 28 3995 9860 / +84 28 3990 3995 / hoanmy.com/saigon / [email protected]


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