Vietnam One of the Best Places to be An Expat in the World!

By: John Mark Harrell

Vietnam’s low cost of living and high wages are unrivaled.

Jobs abound in a country with a growing economy and limitless career opportunities.

A modern, convenient lifestyle in Vietnam is not only accessible--it’s the norm.

Meals for $1, weekly transportation for $10, rent for $100, and a minimum monthly salary of $1000... sounds impossible, right? In Vietnam, not only is this possible, it’s reality for many expats! Major cosmopolitan hubs like Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi, and Da Nang are some of Vietnam’s most popular gathering places for expats from all over the world seeking low cost of living, an abundance of career opportunities, and the famously friendly welcome of Vietnamese locals. Vietnam is a country that beckons expats from all walks of life to jump right into the middle of the action. Read on to find out why Vietnam is consistently ranked one of the world’s best places to be an expat.

Vietnam for ExpatsImage source: workinasia.net

High Salary, Low Cost of Living

For expats looking to save money, Vietnam is a financial paradise. Last year, Vietnam jumped up 3 places on the 2018 InterNations survey of the world’s best countries for expats, ranking 9th overall, and climbing all the way to 4th for countries with the lowest cost of living. Expats living in Vietnam consistently report more savings, more expendable income, and lower expenses than almost any other country in the world.

What exactly can you expect to earn in Vietnam? According to a 2018 Go Overseas survey, most expats are English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers earning an average wage of 22.7 million VND (US $1,000) to 45.5 million VND (US $2,000) per month, which places Vietnam in the world’s top 9 countries paying the highest EFL salaries. A 2018 HSBC survey found that, taking all professional fields into consideration, the average annual expat income in Vietnam is $90,000 US. Coupled with the cost of living, Vietnam ranks first in the world for increased savings and expendable income.

Vietnam for ExpatsImage source: starsinsider.com

Housing in Vietnam is incredibly easy to come by as cities like Ho Chi Minh are rapidly expanding, with new houses and apartments flooding real estate listings daily. Almost all housing available to expats includes furniture, parking, western appliances, and weekly or daily cleaning services (often including laundry service). For all of these perks, plus utilities, you can expect to pay anywhere from $100 to $300 US per month for a private room, including an en-suite bathroom, in a comfortable house share near the city center. Of course, those looking for a little more opulence can rent spacious modern apartments at a monthly average of $500-$1000 or more, depending on what your budget allows.

Vietnam for ExpatsImage source: luxstay.com

How about meals? Street food in Vietnam is the cheapest way to go, with a delicious and freshly-prepared bowl of noodles usually averaging less than $2 US! Gone are the days where eating out is a luxury. Many expats prefer eating out as it is comparable in cost to buying groceries, and saves precious time for those with busy work schedules. With an endless variety of mouth-watering local dishes to try, you’ll not only save money on meals in Vietnam, you’ll discover and crave new foods you never knew existed.

With less money spent on cost of living, most expats in Vietnam experience unparalleled financial freedom, allowing them to travel more often, repay debts like student loans, and set aside money for retirement. It is, without a doubt, the number one reason anyone should consider moving to Vietnam.

Career Opportunities in Vietnam

Vietnam is also a fantastic place to build a career, and though most expats teach EFL for a living, there is a growing and thriving community of expats in a variety of professional fields such as business marketing and advertising, graphic design, hospitality, physical and mental well-being, real estate, non-profit organizations, small business ownership, and many more.

Vietnam for ExpatsImage source: shutterstock.com

Vietnam is the world’s number one country for expats to find a job, according to the 2018 InterNations report. Not ready to commit to a job remotely? No problem! Expats routinely move to Vietnam on a tourist visa and find themselves newly employed within days. 

How is this possible? Coupled with an unprecedented economic growth, Vietnam’s booming business sector is constantly on the hunt for foreign experts to take critical roles in young companies experiencing rapid expansion. 

Vietnam for ExpatsImage source: urbanistnetwork.com

The nation’s education system is expanding and improving rapidly as well, with new job openings not only at traditional schools, but increasingly popular language centers offering classes on weekday evenings and weekends. Not only are low-experience or first-time teachers welcomed here, but seasoned academic professionals looking to fill higher positions at prestigious private and international schools are highly sought-after as well.

Professional opportunities abound for expats in Vietnam. As of June 2018, an estimated 105,000 expats lived and worked in Vietnam. With that number set to increase dramatically year over year, there is no better time than now to take advantage of the fertile job market and exciting career choices available to expats in Vietnam.

A Fully Modern Lifestyle

Anyone moving from their home country will consider to some degree what they’ll miss about the comforts of home. Fortunately, foreigners living in Vietnam report very little compromise for the incredibly low cost of living and comparably high salary. In major urban centers like Saigon, Hanoi, and Da Nang, there is no shortage of modern amenities like convenience stores, grocery stores, and shopping malls stocked with familiar Western brands and products.

Vietnam for ExpatsImage source: bstatic.com

Among the greatest concerns for any expat is safety. Vietnam not only ranks as one of the world’s safest countries for expats, but also as one of the top 10 friendliest places on earth according to the 2018 InterNations report. 

Health-conscious individuals, those with sensitive diets, and self-proclaimed gourmands increasingly have access to hundreds of modern restaurants featuring high-quality ingredients and international cuisines ranging from Korean to European, even Mexican! 

Most importantly, the nation’s healthcare system has dramatically improved over the last few decades, with modern facilities and a variety of private Western hospitals and clinics staffed with international experts in major urban centers. 

Vietnam is Waiting for You!

There are few places in the world with comparable amenities to Vietnam. Numerous expat surveys from the world’s biggest expat networks including InterNations, Expat Insider and Go Overseas, consistently rank Vietnam as one of the world’s best countries for expats thanks to the famously low cost of living, fantastic career opportunities, and a fascinating and friendly local culture comfortably coupled with all the modern amenities a foreigner could want for.

Vietnam for ExpatsImage source: googleusercontent.com

Banner Image source: shutterstock.com


Four Female Chefs You Should Know About in Vietnam

By: Lucie Sherwood

Most of us have an image of professional kitchens as being something of a male-dominated boy's club, despite women traditionally doing most of the cooking in private homes for centuries. Whilst women still account for a relatively low portion of professional chefs globally, there are more women enrolling for training and a number of female chefs rank among the best in the world, earning major accolades and awards.

As Vietnam’s foodie landscape grows and evolves, more international and Vietnamese restaurants are opening and drawing in big talents, both local and foreign. Among these rising stars are several talented female chefs who are shaking up Vietnam’s culinary scene with their unique take on Vietnamese and international cuisines, often drawing influence from their diverse geographical backgrounds.

Here are four of the best female chefs in Vietnam right now, and where to eat their food.

Tam Le - Saigonita Concept Rebstaurant in Saigon

Tam Le’s Saigonita is a concept restaurant that reinterprets Mexican cuisine through the lens of Vietnamese ingredients and dishes. The creator and chef hosts her intimate pop-up dinners on select evenings every month. Already, Saigonita is storming the foodie scene in Saigon, with Tam’s dinners booked-out two months in advance.

Tam has had an unconventional route to Saigonita. She was raised in Texas before leaving to work in branding in New York, where she recalls beginning to make her own tortillas after discovering that she could only buy them imported and mass-produced in New York, unlike the fresh tortillas available in grocery stores across Texas. As an Texas-born Vietnamese, she grew up eating both Mexican and Vietnamese cuisines and says, “to combine them was only natural to me”.

Female ChefsImage source: Tam Le

After moving to Vietnam, Tam started to make the Saigonita vision a reality, creating her exciting Vietnamese-Mexican food with encouragement from her friends. As the concept was being developed, Tam Le spent her evenings and weekends experimenting to bring her new dishes to life. Now that her dinners have gained momentum, she is dedicating herself to Saigonita full-time.

The Saigonita menu changes depending on what’s in season and the chef’s mood. Tam describes her Huế-vos Rancheros as a current crowd favourite; a tostada with a fried home-made tortilla base, a layer of refried black beans, beef braised in the style of bún bò Huế, a fried quail egg, finely chopped shallots and herbs, and finished off with a squeeze of calamansi.

Tam doesn’t consider her gender to be challenge in Vietnam’s culinary world. She explains, “I see so many opportunities in Vietnam”, although she acknowledges that the industry is very male-dominated. As her unique concept becomes increasingly popular, she describes her goal as, “to figure out how to allow everyone who wants to try Saigonita to be able to experience it”.

Nikki Tran - Cau Ba Quan and Cau Ba Noodles Restaurants in Saigon

Famous for her appearance on the Netflix hit series Ugly Delicious, Nikki Tran is dishing up her brand of ‘Viejun’ (Vietnamese-Cajun) food in her two modern Vietnamese seafood restaurants; Cau Ba Quan and Cau Ba Noodles in Ho Chi Minh City.

A Saigon native who has spent time in Houston, Texas - where the Viet-Cajun trend began - Nikki describes her cooking as a collaboration between Vietnamese culture and other cultures, but is adamant that her food isn’t branded as ‘fusion’.

Nikki never trained as a professional chef, nor did she have any aspirations to cook, but she was thrown into the kitchen when the chef didn’t show up on the opening night. Now she loves to create new dishes and her aspiration is to bring modern Vietnamese food to the mainstream, showing the cuisine from a different angle.

Female ChefsImage source: Nikki Tran

Nikki acknowledges the challenges of working in a male-dominated industry, describing how gaining authority in the kitchen can be difficult for women working in a traditionally patriarchal society such as Vietnam. She added that even in the US, it isn’t easy to command respect from the other chefs in a professional kitchen. She also expressed her belief that the conventional female roles within a family in Vietnam can limit their ability to work long hours.

Nevertheless, Nikki feels that there are a lot of opportunities out there for aspiring female chefs to be noticed, stating, “the creativity brought by women is highly anticipated and appreciated”. She advises women to be tough in the kitchen and to have confidence that female chefs can do whatever male chefs can do, whether its scaling a fish or butchering a whole cow.

Nguyễn Thị Hồng Huệ - Stoker Restaurant in Saigon

Stoker has been making waves in Saigon’s culinary scene for some time now, and its Junior Sous Chef, Nguyễn Thị Hồng Huệ, is one of the restaurant’s rising stars. Stoker’s speciality is cooking meats using various techniques involving fire, perhaps making the presence of a strong female chef even more unusual.

Female ChefsImage source: Hue Nguyen

After studying finance, Hue embarked on her chef’s training and gained experience in a number of professional kitchens before joining Stoker in May 2017. She worked in the cold kitchen and In pastry before being promoted to Junior Sous Chef.

Working with Stoker’s Executive Chef, George Bloomfield, Hue has created new signature dishes for the popular steakhouse, including Smoked Milk Panna Cotta and Woodfired Basque Cheesecake.

Hue explains that she finds Ho Chi Minh City “one of the best places to explore local and international food”, with its eclectic range of restaurants and diverse food scene. Hue highlighted that this environment creates lots of opportunities for female chefs to develop their careers. She says that, “women in general are well-known for being careful, resourceful and tidy; which are good values for a chef”.

Her advice to aspiring female chefs is to “follow your passion”, acknowledging that things can be difficult at the beginning but these challenges can be overcome. Hue's goal is to eventually gain experience and learn about Northern Vietnamese cuisine by spending time working in Hanoi.

Summer Le - Nen Restaurant in Danang

Now an unofficial global ambassador for Central Vietnamese cuisine, Chef Summer Le has been expressing her passion for the food of her home-region at her acclaimed restaurant, Nen, since August 2017. The ethos of Nen - a spice specific to Central Vietnam - is to push the boundaries of Vietnamese cuisine whilst retaining its core values.

Female ChefsImage source: Summer Le

Before opening her Danang restaurant, she was a food blogger and has been featured on several cooking shows including the Asia Food Channel’s 'Home-cooked Vietnam'. Despite Nen being a reasonably young restaurant, it has received wide attention, being visited by the Prime Minister of New Zealand and three Michelin star Chef Dominique Crenn from the US.

Summer Le explains her food philosophy as, “utilising local ingredients and making them the star of the dishes” in order to create her modern Vietnamese dishes. She aims to keep the taste profiles essentially Vietnamese, while using some foreign techniques and presentation. She describes her food as, “a reflection of myself” creative, intellectual, with great attention to detail”. She explains that she especially loves to experiment with elevating often overlooked ingredients in Vietnamese cuisine, such as duck, certain fruits and fermented sauces.

Nen’s New Vietnamese multi-course tasting menu is a collection of Summer Le’s signature dishes, including a pan-seared duck breast with mango gel and Viet satay chili paste with cashew nuts and dried mango.

Summer Le feels Vietnam is open-minded when it comes to women in the workplace in comparison with some of its neighbouring countries. She points out that the industry is heavily male-dominated, but cites the physical requirements of the job as one of the reasons for this. At Nen, she hires both male and female chefs on her team, explaining that, “they have their own strengths”. She details, “attention to detail, deftness and discipline” as qualities she often finds in her female chefs and which are particularly relevant in a fine-dining restaurant. Her advice to aspiring female chefs is to, “find your unique strength as a chef and pursue it”.

Banner Image source: citypassguide.com


Things not to do in Vietnam

By: Quang Mai

Following the post about “Tips to spot and avoid scams and pick pockets”, City Pass Guide provides a list of things not to do in Vietnam that can secure visitors and help them to make their trip in Vietnam enjoyable.

On the street

To avoid being robbed or becoming victims of pickpockets, we highly recommended travelers not to carry more money than they need when walking around the streets, especially when you are alone. Wear as little jewelry as possible, as even fake jewels attract unwelcome attention from would-be robbers. In fact, thieves and drive-by snatchers do not have time to decide if jewelry is high value or not; they simply take whatever opportunity comes their way through a moment’s carelessness.

When taking a ride by xe om (motorbike taxi) make sure your bag, if any, is not on display or easy to grab. Bag snatches, although relatively rare, are probably the most likely crime a tourist will encounter, and it the risk is increased enormously if your prized camera or laptops are clearly visible.

Cultural issues

Wearing large amounts of jewelry is considered impolite because it seems to be flaunting wealth in public.

Don't wear singlets, shorts, dresses or skirts, or tops with low-neck lines and bare shoulders to Temples and Pagodas. To do this is considered extremely rude and offensive. Don’t be surprised when you notice some local ladies wearing them. Such dress is actually being criticized in many official and unofficial discussions in both online and print /media. You should not create any chances for locals to lay the blame on western culture.

Never sleep or sit with the soles of your feet pointing towards the family altar when in someone's house.

Never lose your temper in public or when bargaining for a purchase. This is considered a serious loss of face for both parties. Always maintain a cool and happy demeanor and you will be reciprocated with the same.

Physical displays of affection between lovers in public are frowned upon. That’s why you may usually come across couples holding hands while very seldom you can see a couple give kiss to each others in the public area. In fact, you may catch some couples hugging or even kissing to pose their selves in front of a camera. They are actually a part of the new generation of Vietnamese who are open-minded and affected by film and entertaining industry.

Ethnic minorities

Avoid giving empty water bottles, sweets and candies or pens to the local people when trekking through ethnic minority villages. You cannot guarantee that the empty bottles will be disposed of in a correct manner, and the people have no access to dental health. If you want to give pens, ask your guide to introduce you to the local teacher and donate them to the whole community.

Never take video cameras into the ethnic minority villages. They are considered to be too intrusive by the local people.

Political issues

Blogging is acceptable if your content stays steer clear of sensitive stories about the government. It is OK to share your personal experiences and review accommodation or restaurants but nothing else. Talk about anything like corruption in the government or even the Vietnam War can lead to a negative reaction on the part of the authorities. Therefore we definitely highlight this important point. It’s better to forget the term of “Freedom of Speech” while travelling in Vietnam.

Do not try to take photographs of military installations or anything to do with the military. This can be seen as a breach of national security.

Anything that depicts pornography is highly illegal. Prostitution also happens to be illegal. If you love bars and nightclubs, Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi probably can serve your interests. But always keep in mind that sharing a hotel room with a Vietnamese of the opposite sex is generally not permitted.

Trading in or possession of drugs is illegal and a capital offence in Vietnam. As in other countries, drug abuse costs a lot in terms of prevention or even reduction, but it seems that it can never be completely eradicated. Therefore, don’t ever carry drugs with you while you are travelling in Vietnam.


Other articles:

Top 5 tips for crossing the street in Vietnam

Top 5 photo tips for travelers in Vietnam

Top 5 tips to rent a motorbike in Vietnam

5 tips to manage your online reputation on Tripadvisor

5 tips of preparation for better score at golf

5 tips to take pictures of fireworks in Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi

Tips to spot and avoid scam and pick pocket

Top 5 tips for preventing theft in Vietnam

The art of bargaining in Vietnam



Facebook redesigns business pages with new look

By: Emilio Piriz

Facebook redesigns business pages with new look

After redesigning its news feed personal accounts last week, Facebook announced that it will roll out a new look and feel for business pages. This affects the Online Reputation Management (ORM) service that we at City Pass provide to premium clients in the Travel and Hospitality sector in Vietnam; therefore we should take these changes into consideration to get the best out of the new features.

The remake means good news to all users of this platform. Even Facebook calls this new appearance a more ‘streamlined’ look. The new design includes two columns similar to the old version, but the right column is now the Page’s timeline while the left includes information about the brand or business (e.g., map, business hours, phone number and website URL). Previously, both left and right columns used to display posts as users would scroll down the page.


Facebook New
Two distinct columns in new design

This major rearrangement makes Facebook Business Pages look a lot more like a personal profile. In a post on the official Facebook for Business blog, the company explained, “We’ll begin rolling out a streamlined look for Pages on desktop that will make it easier for people to find the information they want and help Page admins find the tools they use most.”

The redesigned layout comes with several changes for City Pass's Social Media management services – part of our ORM package – as Page admins. Stats such as page likes, the number of ad campaigns, post reach impressions, and notifications will appear in a tool bar in the right column. Therefore, administrators now have this information readily available in one place without having to navigate through numerous menus.

The new appearance actually makes the desktop version look more like the mobile version. This offers a more unified experience for your visitors no matter what device they’re using to follow your feed. Additionally, the ‘face makeover’ comes less than a week after Facebook updated the look for news feeds. This is a fairly minor change that includes larger photos and new icons and fonts.

How do you like Facebook’s latest redesigns? Do you think they will achieve their primary goal in improving the user’s experience?



Posts run on both left and right side in old design

A Guide to Moc Bai Border And What You Should Know

By: Sivaraj Pragasm

The “border run”, as dodgy as it may sound, is an experience that many expats in Vietnam are familiar with. For expats living in Saigon or other nearby southern provinces, the thought of the long ride up to Moc Bai in Tay Ninh Province on the border of Cambodia could evoke anything from a disgruntled groan to a fair bit of excitement. It depends on how you feel about burning at least half a working day going somewhere you’d rather not be, just to ensure you remain in the country legally.

Typically, most expats will have to wait a few weeks or months to get their official work permit sorted out. This means if you’re the proud owner of a 1, 3 or 6-month tourist or business visa, you will need to ensure you get a new visa on the day the current one expires.

Buying a Visa for the Moc Bai Border Crossing

Depending on which country you’re from, the process starts with finding a legitimate and reputable visa agent to obtain a letter that you’ll need to submit to the immigration officer. You can easily find a visa agent amongst the many expat groups on Facebook. All you need to do is ask, and you’ll either get a private message from one, or a referral from another expat.

Vietnam allows visa-exemptions to citizens of Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Norway, Germany, France, Spain, Italy, The United Kingdom, South Korea, Japan and fellow ASEAN member states, excluding Timor Leste and Cambodia, for limited periods ranging from 14 to 30 days. If you’re not from any of these countries, or if you need a visa for more than a month, you’ll need to find that visa agent regardless of where you’re from. It’s best to seek this information directly from the visa agent as the immigration rules are constantly changing and it can be quite confusing and challenging trying to keep track.

The countries that do not enjoy visa-exemptions are categorised into different “tiers” that determine how much you will need to spend for the letter and what kinds of visas you are eligible for. This letter typically costs anywhere between US$25 to US$40 and will be e-mailed to you within 2 working days. Then the fun starts.

Getting To The Moc Bai Border

There are many ways to get to Moc Bai Border, either via private transport through your visa agent that might cost quite a bit but will save you lots of time or public transport. For the purpose of this article, I will focus on the latter as that’s the most commonly used and also the cheapest.

It’s always good to start your border run bright and early in the morning, preferably before 9:00 a.m. because it will generally take anywhere between 5 to 8 hours depending on how familiar you are with the process and the traffic situation during the journey. It’s also a good idea to pack some small snacks and a bottle of water and have plenty of VND in small denominations. Alternatively, you may also bring USD with you, either currency is fine. Don’t forget to bring along a printout of the visa letter, plus 2 passport-sized photographs and cash for the stamping fee either in USD or VND.

The cheapest way to get to the border is by bus number 703 that you can board at Saigon Bus Station at Pham Ngu Lao street in District 1. You can find these buses parked near the entrance facing the Cong Quynh Street roundabout. The buses, run by SAPACO Tourist are usually blue or silver with Moc Bai written on the front display. The 3-hour journey will cost you only VND40,000 each way.

Mộc BàiImage source: foxtravels.net

For those of you who have never taken a public bus in Vietnam, all you need to do is board the bus, take a seat and a few minutes later, the bus conductor will collect the fare in exchange for a paper ticket. As your bus streams across the city, you will be joined by a whole bunch of other passengers, mostly locals. They will not be doing the border run with you. At some point, the erratic swarms of motorbikes and incessant honking will be replaced by vast fields with grazing buffaloes and half-completed skeletons of bridges, highways and roads as you make your way out of Saigon.

The Actual Visa Run

Once your bus reaches the destination, it will be fairly obvious to you because the driver will yell something in Vietnamese. Then you will see a group of xe om drivers circling the bus, congregating near the exit and you will see a whole bunch of trucks lined up along the road, waiting to cross the border. At this point, you have two options.

The first option, or what I call, the ‘express package’, is to get on the back of one of these bikes and for a fare of VND100,000, the xe om driver will drive you through the checkpoints at the border and back to the bus station. This option can be very tricky for the first timer because there is a very high chance you might end up spending much more than the VND100,000 quoted to you.

These additional charges include simple tasks such as filling out forms for you or helping you join ‘express queues’ at the various checkpoints. The good thing with this option is you will most likely clear the whole process within an hour. However, if you prefer doing this entire border run without spending a single dong or cent, then option two is for you.

Mộc BàiImage source: flickr.com

Once you disembark from the bus and politely decline the swarm of xe om drivers, walk towards the large line of trucks. Here, you will realise that you’re on a road that’s about 500 metres long that leads directly to the border. The walk itself will take about 10 minutes until you reach the complex. There is a high chance you will see multiple lines which all seem the same. However, since you didn’t get the ‘express package’, you’ll have to join the ‘normal queue’, on the extreme right. This queue is usually the longest.

Once you’ve gotten your exit stamp, you can proceed to walk towards the Cambodian immigration complex about 200 metres away. Upon arrival, a couple of guys may approach you, offering to fill out the immigration form for you. If you’re not in the mood to hold a pen, these guys will do it for you for a small fee, not more than VND50,000. If you require a visa to enter Cambodia, these guys can help you with the process.

Once you’ve cleared Cambodian immigration, you can proceed towards the exit ahead of you, turn around at the rear parking lot and head towards the exit queue, which is outdoors and also doubles up as a checkpoint for vehicles. After you’ve gotten your exit stamp, you’ll have to walk back towards Vietnam to sort out your Vietnamese visa, the reason why you’re even here in the first place.

When you enter the complex, you will see a bunch of guys wearing blue uniforms. They work at the border and will insist on helping you fill out the application form, then help you submit the form to the immigration officer once you’ve paid the stamping fee. This amount depends on which visa you’re getting. You can always refuse this service and do it by yourself but it’ll take longer.

After a 15-minute wait, you’ll get your passport returned to you with the new visa in place and you can then proceed to the final phase of your border runre-entering Vietnam. Don’t forget to check the visa before you leave to make sure you got what you paid for. Once you’ve cleared the exit queues, congratulations. You’re now legally back in Vietnam. Now you just have to sit through the arduous 3-hour journey back to Saigon Bus Station.

Mộc BàiImage source: vietnamtravel.guide

What You Need to Remember When Doing a Visa Run

There are a few important things you need to know to ensure a safe and smooth border run. The first thing is to make sure you have the required documents with you. These include the visa letter, photographs and cash.

The latter is the most crucial. It is advisable to bring a slightly higher amount than you expect. As a foreigner, and especially if you’re a first-timer, you’re going to be bombarded by service providers you don’t really need and you might end up forking over some extra cash. In addition, there is no ATM at the border. The nearest one is a 15-minute bike ride away courtesy of a xe om ride that will probably cost you another VND100,000.

Another important thing to remember is to check the expiry date of your current visa. If you’ve accidentally overstayed your visa, the immigration officer will point it out to you and you will be required to pay a fine depending on how long you have overstayed. You will also be required to sign some documents as part of the paperwork process. Once again, an inconvenience that could easily be avoided. Also ensure your passport has a minimum validity of six months or you might not be allowed to enter Cambodia, effectively wasting your time and effort getting there.

If you need more information, feel free to reach out to visa agents who are mostly bilingual.

Video source: Edges Of Earth

Banner Image source: fee.org


What is the Year of the Pig in Vietnam?

By: Angee the Diva

This is my second year in Saigon for Tet holiday. I love being in the city when it’s quieter and less chaotic. I ride leisurely through District 1 and try to feel the zen of its relative calm instead of annoyance when my favorite places are closed for a few days. No traffic, no queues, no incessant horn-blowing, no crowds. My narcissistic mind just enjoys being the first and only for a brief period in a city that is otherwise basically a hive. But, true to my expat ignorance, it only recently crossed my mind to try to understand what’s happening and why all of my neighbors go away for the biggest holiday in Vietnam.

year of the pigImage source: izwanshahmin.com

Enter the Year of the Pig. The origins of its story lie in the Chinese zodiac. Like eons ago, the Jade Emperor called for a race of 12 animals. The cunning, creative, and uniquely beautiful rat (by the way, apparently, I’m a rat) was first to finish. The other animals arrived at the palace one by one. Just when the Emperor is thinking the pig is never going to make it, in he strolls like whatevs.

Seems the pig got hungry and stopped for a big lunch and a casual nap for a few hours. No big deal. Seriously, it’s a pig, so the Jade Emperor shouldn’t have been that surprised. Honestly, I get it. I’d totally choose a pizza and Netflix binge over a stroll in the Ho Chi Minh City’s humidity any day.

year of the pigImage source: sapo.vn

Anyway, this is where you gotta throw out all those preconceived notions. Kudos for the positive spin on that “lazy pig” fake news, Vietnam. Don’t even think of fat shaming the pig, cause according to the Vietnamese zodiac, pigs are total bosses! A quick look at Vietnamese food proves they hold pigs in high regard. There are no losers here. Pigs like to have full bellies and pockets, so they do what it takes to get the paycheck. They are patient, tolerant and hard-working. It might take them a bit longer to get the job done, but they’ll be rewarded with all the dongs.

year of the pigImage source: sapo.vn

And since they like to eat with others, pigs are the coolest kids at the party. Legendary for a taste for the luxe life and a friendly attitude, people love to be around pigs. Add in optimism, good luck, generosity, and loyalty - sounds like it’s time to find a new bestie!

If you’re lucky enough to be born in the Year of the Pig, get ready to be living your best life in 2019. This year is a good time to start a new business or make important business moves. Try to secure a new bae or get to work on creating a little piglet of your own wink. Even if you’re not a pig, this is supposed to be a prosperous and productive year. Be like the pig - take your time and be aware of obstacles for optimal results.

Maybe you believe all this or maybe you don’t. Either way, remember to be respectful of our host country and its gracious people. It’s always a good year to learn something new about the people around you smile.

Best wishes for long life, health, and wealth to all in the Year of the Pig! Chúc Mừng Năm Mới 2019!

year of the pigImage source: kenh14cdn.com

If you’re staying in Saigon during the Tet Holiday, be sure to check out the Best of the Week: Special Tet Edition for some fun events.

Banner Image source: mspoweruser.com

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