Best Eco Friendly Cosmetics and Skincare in Saigon & Vietnam

By: Laura Nalin

Coconut Religion

Herpas

The Queen

A Banker’s Secret

Stone Hill

The Organik Shop

The Herbal Cup

Skinna

Within the past year, it seems that consumers throughout Vietnam are becoming increasingly interested in spending a little extra on eco-friendly products, in Saigon and elsewhere. A number of restaurants throughout Ho Chi Minh City are now providing metal or bamboo straws, stores are hawking reusable goods. People are collectively beginning to care more and more about the environment, and skincare is no exception to this movement.

As the demand for sustainable consumption continues to rise, so does the public’s desire for environmentally friendly cosmetics. Several Korean outlets throughout town such as Innisfree and Skin Food offer them and, more interestingly, plenty of local companies are making their way into the market, too.

Typically, all kinds of sustainable beauty products are clustered together under the umbrella of being “green,” or “organic,” but the products on this list go above and beyond. Each of these companies based in Vietnam source their formulas sustainably, use all-natural ingredients and offer eco-friendly packaging.

For those of you interested in buying some environmentally friendly cosmetics and skincare products in Saigon and beyond in Vietnam, look no further: here’s a list of some of my favourite brands, as well as a couple that I’m keen on trying.

Coconut Religion

coconutreligion.com

The Coconut Religion brand instantly made a name for itself in both the expat and local communities in Saigon and Vietnam in record time. It has been in operation for just a few months, but this travel-friendly, certified organic, raw cold-pressed coconut oil has become a staple in every recent market and event and also maintains a killer social media presence.

The Coconut Religion founder, Maggie Shen, is an Australian genius who not only sources the products from the fertile Mekong Delta region, but has made sure that the product stays thick and creamy despite the tropical heat. How cool is that? The ‘jungle to jar’ products have gained a cult following for a reason. The products come carefully packaged in all-natural fabric and I recently purchased her lavender coconut oil as well as the lip balm. Take my money, Coconut Religion.

Cosmetics and Skincare in SaigonImage source: Coconut Religion

The Queen

The Queen on Facebook

I attended a workshop at The Hive, in District 2 of Ho Chi Minh City, that promoted eco-friendly products last year. At that workshop, I and several other attendees created our own organic lipsticks using beeswax, organic argan oil, Vitamin E, coconut oil and natural pigments. I’ve been a fan of lipstick for most of my life, but I’ve become turned off at the thought of animal testing.

I wear my lipstick from The Queen daily; it’s not as thick as standard brands, but I enjoy that. While I’m not sure this brand has taken off quite yet throughout town, I stand behind the quality and thought that goes into the process to create such environmentally friendly cosmetics.

Cosmetics and Skincare in SaigonImage source: The Queen

Stone Hill

stonehill.vn

Another local brand in Vietnam making a name for itself is Stone Hill, an innovative business that produces natural products from Vietnamese cocoa plants. The company sources all of its cocoa from its own farm in Dong Nai Province, all of which is grown to quality standards and helps make the Stone Hill soaps and skincare products stand head and shoulders above less sustainable options.

I have a jar of Stone Hill’s cocoa butter, and I swear by it as it’s one of the only products that makes my chronically dry skin feel silky smooth. In addition to my favourite product, Stone Hill also offers cocoa-based scrubs, scented body butter, hand cream and a handful of scented soaps. Definitely check this one out if your skin needs some nourishment!

Cosmetics and Skincare in SaigonImage source: Stone Hill

The Herbal Cup

The Herbal Cup on Facebook

I haven’t tried any of these products yet, but The Herbal Cup, based in Ho Chi Minh City, has certainly been on my radar. One of the more interesting things about this company is that it provides a free consultation to decide which of its products are most suitable for your skin.

Each of the environmentally friendly skincare confections include organic ingredients such as gac fruit oil, centella, tomato, sesame and the ever-popular tea tree leaves. Consumers have the option from a number of creations such as scrubs, masks, lipsticks, cleansing gels and body lotions. Everything is locally sourced, so there will be no regrets after purchase.

Cosmetics and Skincare in SaigonImage source: The Herbal Cup

Herpas

Herpas on Facebook

The plant-based products created by Herpas’ owner Ha Truc Le were originally intended to encourage Vietnamese consumers to purchase locally-made products. Truc’s concoctions are formulated through her extensive knowledge of natural healing properties, which is what makes Herpas such an interesting, environmentally friendly cosmetics and skincare line. Her lotions, scrubs and oils are intended to lock in moisture and reduce the effects of ageing, ideal for the amount of toxic chemicals our skin is exposed to here.

Cosmetics and Skincare in SaigonImage source: Herpas

A Banker’s Secret

A Banker's Secret on FB

Have you ever read stories about people who were living traditional lifestyles, working in high-income positions who ended up quitting their job to follow their passion? That’s precisely what Quynh, the founder of A Banker’s Secret did. Before catalysing the concept of A Banker’s Secret, Quynh was working as, well, you guessed it: a banker. She spent her free time creating handmade scented soaps for her loved ones, and soon realised that’s what she would rather be doing full-time.

Quynh quit her job in 2012, and has embarked on an exciting journey since, turning her labour of love into a thriving environmentally friendly cosmetics and skincare company in Vietnam. Although she simply sold just scented soaps at the start, Quynh now offers masks, scrubs, essential oils, cream oils and pomade as well.

Cosmetics and Skincare in SaigonImage source: A Banker’s Secret

The Organik Shop

organik.vn

Located in the heart of Saigon’s District 2, on the busy Thao Dien Street, sits this store, which is known for carrying some of the highest quality, environmentally friendly cosmetics and skincare in Vietnam. Not only that, but it’s a one-stop-shop for those of you who are also keen on revamping your entire lifestyle into a more sustainable, eco-friendly, non-toxic one; there are plenty of food, household and skincare items available for your ethical shopping needs.

Cosmetics and Skincare in SaigonImage source: The Organik Shop

Skinna

Skinna on Facebook

I think it’s safe to say that many people across the globe would agree that grandmothers encompass some sort of mystical wisdom. More interestingly, Skinna was derived from that notion. Over a decade ago, Christine Ho was talking to her grandmother when she realised the matriarch of her family had some pretty interesting beauty secrets up her sleeve. Ho’s grandmother provided some ancient Vietnamese beauty tips that were passed down from the Hue royal lineage; some of the holistic recommendations include household ingredients such as eggs and turmeric as natural exfoliants.

Cosmetics and Skincare in SaigonImage source: Skinna

Each of Skinna’s products cater to varying skin types and conditions. Items sold include lipstick, serums, creams, cleansing products, sheet masks and body wash, making Skinna one of the most prosperous environmentally friendly cosmetics and skincare providers in Saigon and Vietnam!

Banner Image source: nyscc.org


Best Shopping in Ho Chi Minh City

By: Rachel Cabakoff

Top shopping experiences in Saigon will usually include any of the typical traditional markets or shopping malls in the city. Rachel tells you more great spots to buy unique products and souvenirs.

For me, living in Ho Chi Minh City I have the luxury of scouring the local markets and the occasional shopping centers whenever I please. I find the value of shopping in this vibrant city to be ever changing. New stores and boutiques are popping up here and there in hidden alleyways, top floors of cafés and more. I am in awe of the beautiful, unique designs that catch my eye on the streets everyday.

When it comes to shopping in this energetic city, the options are endless. HCMC has something for everyone when it comes to quality, handcrafted products. With an array of skills and goods — embroidery, vases, coffee, paintings, woodwork, crafts and more — one can’t go wrong when it comes to shopping here, it is just a matter of knowing where to look.

Ben Thanh Market
Ben Thanh Market.

Now, as far as retail shopping here it is not necessarily considered the “shopping city” of Southeast Asia. Yes, there is the Diamond Plaza and Vincom Center shopping malls for the luxury brand names along with the local Vietnamese markets — Ben Thanh Market, Saigon Square and more. However, when one mentions a shopping trip to a friend, HCMC doesn’t generally come to mind.

Saigon Square Shopping HCMC
Saigon Square.

Normally Bangkok, Hong Kong or Kuala Lumpur are mentioned as more ‘go-to’ shopping destinations for your usual international chains like Forever 21, Gap American Eagleand so on. Although these chains cannot be found here in HCMC, the value of what can be found here is much greater than what most would expect.

As the largest city in Vietnam, HCMC houses a hub of talented artists and designers from near and far. Although it is a new and emerging market, the merchandise quality and value is much higher than what can be found in the larger retailers at the shopping malls.

Station 3A

With the growing emergence of up and coming designers, HCMC has become a much more worthwhile shopping experience. Just last April, Station 3A among other areas around town have given local artists the opportunity to showcase their work.

Station 3A Ideal Shopping Place HCMC
Photo credit: Station 3A.

Located in a hidden alley off of Ton Duc Thang Street in District 1, Station 3A exhibits galleries, studios, clothing stores, cafés and more — shoppers can find high quality products ranging from fashion accessories, pottery, artwork and more. With a fusion of local art and design, this hub of creativity has brought in high-quality products. Stores such as the famous pottery shop, Sa Dec District features Vietnamese handicrafts inspired by the Mekong Delta in addition to Cushion Art exhibiting home furnishings and accessories inspired by symbols of Vietnam like the lotus flowers, incense and more. The value and authenticity of these shopping experienceshere cannot be found in those major cities mentioned before.

Cushion Art Best Places to Shop
Photo credit: Cushion Art.

L'Usine

This new influx of hot spots has opened up throughout this city within the past few years catering not only to the morepermanent expats of HCMC but also the passer-bys. The café/restaurant/boutique — L’Usine (main location is at 151/1 Dong Khoi St. D. 1) is just one of the many examples of boutique-style cafes opening up throughout the city that have successfully incorporated contemporary global fashion and Vietnamese creativity into one. Although their products are not cheap they are of the highest quality and it is obvious in the designs and craftsmanship of each piece of merchandise. From women’s and men’s clothing to little trinkets such as notebooks, wall art and jewelry — L’Usine is a prime example of the movement that is occurring throughout HCMC in the contemporary shopping scene. A few other cafes that incorporate fashion into their settings include Au Parc (23 Han Thuyen, D.1), Merci Boutique Café (93/15 Xo Viet Nghe TinhSt., Binh Thanh) and more.

Au Parc Best Cafe Fashion Shop
Au Parc.

Custom-made clothing

On top of the designers and boutiques, we mustn’t forget about what makes Vietnam so distinct and that is thelocal tailors here. Known as one of the leading manufacturing countries — Vietnam houses a handful of skilled tailors who can make almost anything. From shoes to jewelry, dresses, suits and more — the options are endless and the value is much greater than what can be found in a retail chain.

Read our review: Finding a Good Tailor in Ho Chi Minh City.

When I was in need of a full-length gown for a last minute event, I turned to a local dress tailor for help. After doing a bit of research I found a gown style online. I then took the picture to a tailor in Phu Nhuan, located just outside of District 1. She took my measurements, I explained to her the type of fabric I wanted and a week later, I had my gown. Simple, right? The gown was an exact replica of the photograph I had shown her. The original design was priced at a retail value of $600 and I didn’t even pay half of that for my custom-made gown. The total price ended up being only $100 for a perfectly fit floor-length gown. This was when I realized how much unique this aspect was to this country in terms of fashion and shopping. Being able to create your own design, choose your fabrics and have a well-crafted final product is a one-of-a-kind experience here. This aspect of HCMC is overlooked when travelers think about the value of shopping in this city. Custom-made products that are made with the highest quality of fabrics and craftsmanship at a reasonable price, this is what defines the real shopping scene in HCMC. So why not take advantage of it during your travels? In as little as 24 hours, the tailors can have a full ensemble made!

L'Usine Best Shopping Experiences HCMC - Vietnam
Photo credit: L'Usine.

Hunting for Fabric

If you’re the type of person who wants to pick out the fabric on your own some key markets to be sure to stop by include, Fabric Street (located along Hai Ba Trung and the Tan Dinh Market), Soai Kinh Lam Market (545 Tran Hung Dao, District 5), and Craft Market which can be found on the corner of Tran Hung Dao and Chau Van Liem in District 5 as well. It may be a little extra work to go and pick out the fabrics yourself but who better to pick out the material than you since you will be the one wearing it.

Although the list of markets varies, one can find most of what they’re looking for at any of the ones listed above. In addition, keep an eye out for local tailor shops along the streets as one makestheir way through HCMC, from custom shoes, wedding dresses and suit tailor shops on Le Thanh Ton Street to all throughout the city — you may end up stumbling upon exactly what they’re looking for.

Although HCMC may not have international retail chains like Forever 21, etc., this city has something much greater than that. As a fast growing city with an influx of people, new businesses and creativity, the fashion and design realm is on the cusp of taking off. This is just the beginning for this dynamic city. Whether you’re passing through or you live here permanently and you’re searching for a different shopping experience — go on an adventure; get outside of your comfort zone. Design your own suit or gown from head to toe, go to that one market located on the edge of District 5 and find something that speaks to you. Find something that represents the true value of shopping here. Seek out the unknown and find something that makes you feel the inspiration and the culture of this amazing city. The question you must ask yourself first is, “What are you really looking for?”


Sustainable Shopping and Other Ways to be A Good Person

By: Molly Headley

International brands are suddenly touting their commitment to conservation and fair labour practices. Marketing companies are pasting words such as “ethical” and “sustainable” across their product packaging.

But how do we sort through all the claims and get honest info on where to shop in HCMC to make a positive impact on the environment and local population? Here are a few companies where you can feel good dropping some cash. These firms have jumped ahead of the curve by aligning their values with the ethical crusade.

From Organic Fabrics to Community Outreach

Metiseko’s website (www.metiseko.com) features photos of models clad in lush silk dresses posed alongside villagers from the mountainous minority regions of Vietnam. Other companies might use this contrast as just imagery in a simple marketing campaign but not Metiseko.

ShoppingImage source: scontent.fsgn2-1.fna.fbcdn.net

Ethical work conditions are a central part of Metiseko’s brand philosophy. Employees are paid higher wages than the minimum authorised by the government—the current government imposed  minimum wage for a non-state owned company in HCMC is VND3,980,000/month (USD175). Though according to reporting in 2017 by VNexpress, there are still issues with the minimum wage structure, most notably the fact that “the wage level is is not enough to live on.”

Metiseko employees work reasonable hours and are provided with health insurance and holidays. Language courses in French, English, Chinese and Vietnamese are open to all employees for their career development. Clothing that is unsold in the stores is donated to minority villages around Hoi An.

The fabrics used are either 100 percent organic cotton sourced from India, or 100 percent mulberry silk from Vietnam. They are dyed with low impact environmental dyes.

Sadly, according to Oceane Bataillon, Marketing & Sales Manager for Metiseko, “We are facing a disappearance of silk producers in Vietnam.” She said that as these producers disappear so do their crafts that have been passed down through generations, such as hand-screen printing and dyeing techniques. Chinese suppliers are providing cheaper and lower quality silk, or “fake silk” and this is hurting some Vietnamese suppliers who strive to create a quality product.

The market price for fake silk is very low and Metiseko prices may seem high in contrast but, according to a 2015 Nielsen report, younger generations are willing to pay more for goods that are created with a conscience. Both Millennials surveyed and Generation Z respondents (15-20 years old) said that they are more likely to buy from companies committed to “positive social and economic impact”. Marketing geared towards sales and discounts for the consumer didn’t even make it into the top five reasons to buy from a company.

“For those willing to spend more, the findings show that personal values are more important than personal benefits, such as cost or convenience.”

Blueberry Night (www.blueberrynightconcept.com) is another brand with ethical values. Their signature vintage cotton and linen fabrics are used for bedding, pillows, handbags and even yoga mat carriers.

Ariane Desaedeleer, co-owner of the brand talked about how she and her partner Virginie Nocquet run an “inclusive business” that directly benefits low-income communities by working with an NGO called FFSC (Friends for Street Children). The company raises money that contributes to a school that FFSC runs for migrant workers’ children unable to attend school.

“I worked for a decade in China where I've witnessed first hand the deplorable working conditions of women in factories. Here in Saigon, we work closely with our workshop located at the top floor of a bright, well-ventilated building and where workers work at their own pace and can have as many breaks as they wish”, Desaedeleer said.

ShoppingImage source: blueberrynightconcept.com

Blueberry Night products are in the "middle-high" price range in the Vietnamese market. “The slightly higher price tag is simply the result of fair wages paid to our seamstresses and of the high quality raw materials that are used.”

Artisanal Does Not Always Mean Fair Trade

The word “artisan” connotes” a skilled trade, especially one that involves making things by hand. The word “skilled” may give the impression that the worker will be paid well for their abilities. However, “artisan” has become a favorite term for marketing. The workers creating the “artisanal” products can still be underpaid, overworked, and subject to unsafe conditions.

Jacques Blanchard, the owner of My Way Deco (www.mywaydeco.com), a luxury lacquerware company in Vietnam, spoke to us about why respecting artisans matters.

“There are fewer and fewer artisans in Vietnam”, Blanchard said. “Vietnam will lose this beautiful tradition because the demand for it is weakening. Real lacquer is expensive. Cheap lacquer is just painting.”

ShoppingImage source: scontent.fsgn2-1.fna.fbcdn.net

For the degree of work that he and his clients expect, Blanchard said he needs the best artists for the job, and to do their detailed work those artists expect more than the bare minimum per month. The high level of skill of these artisans means that if they aren’t paid properly they won’t stay. Blanchard designs the pieces but he says he owes much of his success to the experienced hands of his workers. For example, for a recent creation for client Petrossian Caviar hundreds of beads were hand rolled out of yarn, wrapped in paper, lacquered an inky black and then glued individually onto a box. This is the kind of detail that Blanchard said is impossible to recreate with a machine.

Above My Way Deco’s main showroom in District 2 there is a workshop where the artisans work together. It is a light-filled room with soft music playing in the background. They work from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and have weekends off. Perhaps the strongest testament to the working conditions at My Way Deco is the fact that most of Blanchard’s team has been with him for 15 to 18 years.

Recycling for the Future

Other notable ecologically-minded companies are Zago Furniture (www.zago-store.vn) and Rostaing Tannery (www.rostaingtannery.com).

ShoppingImage source: zago-store.vn

Zago Furniture has an FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) Certification for eco-friendly products. FSC is an international NGO that sets the environmental and social standards for responsibly managed forests.

Rostaing Tannery, mentioned in the article “Leather de Luxe”, was the first in Vietnam to introduce renewable energy in the form of solar panels. Water used in the process is collected through rain harvesting and treating wastewater. Rostaing Tannery was also awarded the Ecologic Innovation Golden Award in Paris in 2011 for their chemical free tanning method.

Now, How Do You Get Your Ethical Purchases Home?

Evolve Mobility (www.evolvemobilityintl.com), owned and managed by Hoa Vu, is a moving logistics and warehousing company in Vietnam with a eye towards innovation. Annie Hansen, founder of Evolve Mobility, said that “The global packaging industry is a major contributor to the waste problem that the planet faces. Moving companies are notoriously traditional and generally do not proactively seek [sustainable] solutions … ”

ShoppingImage source: evolvemobilityintl.com

Evolve Mobility has incorporated a reduce, reuse, recycle policy and all of their boxes and paper materials are made in Vietnam from 100 percent recycled materials. Next on their radar is finding an alternative to bubble and plastic wrap, for which they are in the early stages of product development. The company also seeks to create the best environment for their workers. One way Evolve does this is by giving end-of-year bonuses to supervisors and the staff rather than shareholders.

“We believe that moving and logistics companies must evolve just as the consumers and clients we serve have evolved”, Hansen said. “What was important 20 years ago was profit. That thinking is now redundant. What we must now consider at each turn today is profit, people, planet.”

Contact Details:

Metiseko
157 Dong Khoi, Ben Nghe, District 1, HCMC

Blueberry Night
Available at The Closet  
Address: 81 Xuan Thuy, Thao Dien, District 2, HCMC
Phone: 090 838 40 85
www.blueberrynightconcept.com
www.facebook.com/blueberrynight.homedecor
www.instagram.com/blueberrynight.homedecor
Email: Blueberrynight.homedecor@gmail.com

My Way Deco
51 Street No.19, An Phu Ward, District 2, HCMC
Tel:+84.8 62960608
Email: sales@mywaydeco.com

Zago Furniture
49 Xuan Thuy, Thao Dien, District 2, HCMC
Phone: 028 2253 4248

Rostaing Tannery
Số 8, Tam An, Long Thanh, Dong Nai
Phone: 0251 3514 133

Evolve Mobility
16 Street, 19A, Thao Dien, District 2, HCMC
Phone: 028 6281 8266

Banner Image source:noipictures.com


The Rise (or Fall) of Mall-Based Retail in Saigon

By: Mervin Lee

The history of shopping malls in Ho Chi Minh City is relatively brief. The country re-opened to foreign investment in the early 1990s, a time in history when inhabitants of numerous major cities in Southeast Asia such as Singapore, Kuala Lumpur and Bangkok were receiving their glutton-like shares of retail therapy via the introduction of mega malls. Investors eyed every possible inch of land in these metropolitan places, effectively holding citizens hostage by nurturing a mall-based retail culture that has, so it seems, never truly hit Vietnam, even until now.

Malls Take Over Valuable Real Estate in Saigon

The first modern ‘mall’ in Ho Chi Minh City, Diamond Plaza, opened its doors in 1999, superseding the antiquated Thuong Xa Tax on Le Loi street, built by French colonialists 136 years ago, as a retail pilgrimage spot for middle class and wealthy Saigonese. The establishment was, however, not very much different from its de-facto ancestor: effectively a departmental store with limited choices of food & beverage (F&B) establishments and recreational facilities such as an arcade, bowling alley and a billiards club.

Fast forward to 2013 where Vincom Centre began operations at the junction of Le Thanh Ton and Dong Khoi street. The arrival of a mall and office tower worthy of presence in even bigger cities signified a rather revolutionary change in retail trends in Vietnam: American apparel brands and fast food chains such as DKNY and Carl’s Jr featured as neighbours beside popular Vietnamese F&B chains including Pho 24 and Highlands Coffee. Between 2013 and 2018, numerous other notable malls such as Saigon Centre, Crescent Mall, SC Vivocity and The Garden Mall began taking over the most valuable plots of land in District 7, District 1 and District 5.

Malls in SaigonImage source: aeonmall-vietnam.com

A walk in these malls, however, easily sparks a common sentiment: most retail tenants in these places seem to be focused on F&B. In fact, this phenomenon has also sparked the birth of an indie-style retail culture in downtown Saigon, where several colonial-era residential buildings such as 42 Nguyen Hue and 26 Ly Tu Trong are now filled with independent cafes and fashion boutiques, many of which cannot afford the sky-high rental costs at larger malls.

Has the convenience of e-commerce and online shopping already beaten mall-based retail to its own game in Vietnam?

An article in April 2018 by the Financial Times stated that the Vietnamese are one of the largest sources of digital consumers, commanding a solid 35 percent of the total online population, compared to 24 percent in Thailand and a measly 3.2 percent in Singapore. Mr. Tran Ngoc Thai Son, founder of Tiki.vn, began with online sales of hard-to-acquire English language books in 2010 and has now expanded to a huge variety of products including electronics and promotional flight tickets. He shared that Vietnam is a “very young country going through a golden population period”. Incidentally, the youth are the most enthusiastic users of mobile devices in Vietnam, potentially the reason e-commerce could be a success here. Amazon is also set to enter the Vietnamese market shortly, competing directing with Lazada, the most popular e-commerce operation in the country. Chinese giant Alibaba owns 83 percent of Lazada, having injected another US$2 billion worth of investment into the company earlier last year.

Malls in SaigonImage source: Shutter Stock

However, tales of smuggled and pirated goods on e-commerce sites are not unheard of. An article by tuoitre.vn showed examples of household appliances by popular brands such as Panasonic and Philips being sold at less than 30 percent of their recommended retail prices on sites such as Lazada, Sendo and Shoppe. The origins of these items are hardly traceable. Could such problems spur consumers back to traditional shopping?

The Changing Architecture of Retail Zones

On the other end of the spectrum, the freedom to operate F&B and retail business from almost any property has turned entire residential enclaves into non-mainstream, open-spaced shopping complexes. The best example is the Thao Dien ward of Saigon’s District 2, known for its high density of villas, condominiums and international schools which mainly serve the foreigner and expat population in Ho Chi Minh City. Xuan Thuy street and its immediate surroundings at the heart of Thao Dien is now a respectable foodie haven; from an American burger bar, barbecue diner, craft beer bar to Hakata-style pork ramen, Danish sorbets and even a celebrity-level duck balut joint, a VND100,000 note suddenly becomes rather powerless in a country known for its cheap eats.

Malls in SaigonImage source: static.asiawebdirect.com

Huynh Van Banh street in Phu Nhuan district is another apt example. Known to young fashionable locals as a mecca for cheap apparel deals, one would wonder why these flamboyant youths would ever bother to sacrifice commuting convenience and low prices to shop at large and intimidating malls. One easily finds similarity to Bugis Street in Singapore, effectively a fashion bazaar built on a now-defunct street between two parallel lengths of old colonial buildings. A feasible strategy would be for the local authorities to designate certain areas in suburban Saigon for similar purposes. Nonetheless, locals may still remain skeptical unless rental rates and shopping can be kept affordable; it is unavoidable that any ‘night market’ or ‘fashion bazaar’ pop-up in Vietnam would quickly be disregarded when compared with highly successful fashion and food bazaars found in downtown Bangkok—potentially leading locals into yet another self-induced bout of inferiority complex.

Perhaps it is time for local mall operators to up the game by identifying the causes of discomfort and local aversion to physical shopping. The reliance on motorbikes as the main form of transportation is a key point that should not be ignored. Parking in malls can be intimidating to some locals; extended walking distances and searching for one’s motorbike in a large parking lot is an uncomfortable experience for many. The purchase of bulky items and groceries is also a challenge: uncomfortable and possibly dangerous.

Thank God for our hardworking ‘shipper’ guys who will stay relevant, regardless of whether malls are here to stay.

Banner Image source: livinglocal.triip.me


The Year in Review: Fast Fashion, Big Money

By: Keely Burkey

Dong Khoi got a bit more foot traffic than usual on 9 September of this year when Swedish clothing company H&M’s hallmark opened in Vincom Dong Khoi. Over the course of the store’s opening day, it was reported that some 10,000 fashionistas filed in.

fashionImage source: kenh14.vn

Other highly publicised openings made fast fashion the undeniable trend of 2017, thanks to Zara’s arrival in September and Massimo Dutti’s entry that same month. Uniqlo’s operator Fast Retailing has even been sighted recruiting staff in Hanoi and Saigon last May for a rumoured opening in 2018, and American company Forever 21 is supposedly not far behind.

There’s no doubt about it: fast fashion is taking over the retail market, and the process hasn’t been slow.

Slightly Less Air

For Carey Zesiger, Manager of Business Development for the HCMC-based international fashion distribution company Havang, the openings are interesting, but also a bit worrying. “It’s a limited market, and I think that these big openings [...] may be sucking the oxygen out of the room a bit, and maybe making things harder for some other retail players, especially in the clothing and apparel space,” he said.

fashionImage source: vincom.com.vn

The fast growth of retail in Vietnam, focused primarily on the growing middle class in both Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, has caused companies to scramble to appeal to a market increasingly looking to consume. The Ministry of Industry and Trade said that 183 foreign brands were already established in Vietnam, filling the market for food, beverages, business services, hotel sectors and fashion. This number will no doubt increase in 2018.

However, urbanisation has put a crimp in the expansion plans of a few brands. “There’s a lot of construction in downtown Ho Chi Minh City, and that’s tying traffic into knots and making it a little difficult to get around. I think that’s discouraging some people from going shopping,” Zesinger said.

With increasingly affluent residents moving farther away from the CBD, the story isn’t what brands are coming in—it’s where they’ll be located.

It’s a Vincom World

Large-scale retail developers are looking less at Saigon’s increasingly congested downtown, and more at Districts 2 and 7 and provinces outside of Saigon. Companies like the Japanese Aeon, Korean Lotte and Vietnamese Vincom have been spreading across the cityscape and, slowly, the country.

In particular, Zesiger is keeping a close eye on Vincom: “They’re definitely leading the way in terms of new retail developments, and everyone’s eager to see how that plays out.”

According to a presentation given by Vincom to attract potential investors, it differs from Aeon and Lotte primarily thanks to its all-tier distribution strategy. While Aeon’s target market is currently people who make approximately US$5,000-US$20,000 per year, and Lotte’s market is geared towards earners who take home over US$20,000, Vincom provide retail opportunities for consumers at all pay levels, from below US$3,000 (Vincom+) to over US$20,000 (Vincom Centres) and everywhere in between.

fashionImage source: vincom.com.vn

Vincom estimates that could account for US$100 billion in potential retail revenue. It currently operates 41 shopping centres around Vietnam; in 2018, it plans to expand this number to 56 in a variety of different provinces previously untouched by this level of retail.

Vingroup’s retail group solidified its dominance in November this year, when Vincom Retail made its debut on the Ho Chi Minh Stock Exchange with record-breaking sales of US$709 million, ultimately placing the net worth of the company at US$3.4 billion.

“Clearly, [Vincom has] been successful at securing locations and also quite successful at funding those developments, and doing that on a rather large scale,” Zesiger said.

Banner image source: vincom.com.vn


Hanoia Boutique is Now Open in Ho Chi Minh City

By: Sivaraj Pragasm

Hanoia, a high-end lacquer producer, has just launched its first boutique in Ho Chi Minh City on Monday July 3 in Ao Dai House (107 Dong Khoi, District 1).

hanoiaImage source: hanoialacquer

The store features exquisite lacquerware, including luxurious and elegant home decor, fine and fashionable jewellery, which combine both contemporary inspirations and traditional Vietnamese craftsmanship. As part of their grand opening, Hanoia boutique will offer special gifts for the early buyers.

Hanoia is the first haute-lacquer house in Vietnam, and its products are recognized by many luxury fashion boutiques around the world. Established in 1997 in an old lacquer village in Binh Duong province, Hanoia specialises in fusing traditional Vietnamese lacquerware with contemporary designs.

hanoiaImage source: hanoialacquer

Hanoia started when a group of European designers teamed up with the most qualified craftsmen from Hanoi, the Vietnamese lacquer capital, to revive a Vietnamese craft that was in danger of being lost. With the love of colours, effects and patterns evoking a sense of nostalgia, they work towards crafting a unique experience in a quality and detail-oriented process using ancestral techniques.

Hanoia owns two workshops in the north and the south of Vietnam with 300 artisans from traditional lacquer-producing villages and talented designers from Europe. Pursuing a philosophy based on innovation, the use of materials, effects, colours and shapes, Hanoia has continuously launched new and unique product lines.

hanoia

Image source: hanoialacquer

Hanoia has quickly gained a following from local and foreign artists, and fine art enthusiasts living in Hanoi, along with visitors from all over the world.

Contact:

Add: Ao Dai House – 107 Dong Khoi, Q.1, Ho Chi Minh city

Tel: +84 28 3827 9383

Website: www.hanoia.com | FB: facebook.com/hanoialacquer

Banner image source: hanoialacquer

 

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