Traffics Fines and Penalties in Vietnam: Know the Risks!

By: City Pass Guide

We tell you what happens if you are caught speeding, not wearing a helmet or seatbelt or using a phone while driving, plus, the cost of parking fines in Vietnam.

traffics fines and penalties in vietnamImage source: Chris Goldberg

You break the law and you are arrested

If you are caught red-handed — for instance if you have forgotten a turn signal or crossed into the wrong lane — in the sight of a policeman, they will walk into the street, point at you with their brightly colored torch, and motion for you to pull over. Beautiful girls and owners of brand new motorcycles have the reputation of being arrested more often.

Good to know: Traffic policemen are obliged by law to salute you when they stop you.

Do not try to escape

Some expats will advise you to pretend not seeing the policemen and ignore them or run away. We think you shouldn't. Trying to avoid them could possibly lead to an accident with another motorist or worse, the police getting on their bikes to chase you down. This will almost definitely lead to your bike being impounded on top of a hefty fine.

Pay a fine or pay a bribe?

Once you have been pulled over, the amount you pay will depend on how much Vietnamese you speak and what paperwork you have. If you pretend to not know Vietnamese, English, or even French, you might be able to get away without paying anything in some cases.

Another trick that seems to work is to talk gibberish and gesticulate: If they feel they are losing their time with you, they might let you go. This will only be an effective way to dodge a fine if the infraction you committed is minor.

traffics fines and penalties in vietnamImage source: baocantho.com.vn

If you are not a good actor/actress, then you will have to pay.

If your paperwork is in order (valid license, vehicle registration, insurance, passport), the only right and legal way to follow is to take the ticket and pay it within a couple weeks at the tax office. However, if you choose this solution, the police officer has the right to confiscate your vehicle’s registration. He may also take your license for extreme cases (read Tips for Buying or Renting a Motorbike in Vietnam for more information).

According to Circular No. 48/2014/TT-BGTVT, any foreigner or Vietnamese citizen residing overseas that wishes to drive in Vietnam shall:

a) Follow procedures for replacing an equivalent driving license of Vietnam if that person already has a national driving license;

b) Be permitted to operate the types of vehicles written on the international driving license without having to replace it with a Vietnam’s driving license if that person already has an international driving license issued by a competent authority of a member state of Convention on Road Traffic 1968;

c) In case an international agreement on driving license to which Vietnam is a signatory prescribes otherwise, such international agreement shall apply.

Even though it is the correct way to do things, it is usually a hassle for both the policemen and for you. To exacerbate the situation, the place to pay your fine might not be where they are keeping your registration license.

Because of these complications, most people choose to pay the fine directly to the cop and to get on with their day. These ‘fines’ can range from VND100,000 - 200,000 for motorbikes and VND500,000 - 1 million cars. Beware that they can be higher than the actual cost of the ticket. The amount will vary depending on your language proficiency, the type of vehicle, and the condition that it is in. Please note that only police wearing brown uniforms are allowed to issue fines and handle traffic violation. Without it, they cannot legally pull you over.

The Consequences: How much will you be fined?

Concerning fines, below is a breakdown of what you can expect to pay if you’re fined according to Decree No. 171/2013/NĐ-CP

 

Behavior or violation

 

Fines (VND)

Temporary keeping your motor (day)

Taking away driving license (day)

Excessive speed from 5 - under 10 km/h

100,000 - 200,000

0

0

Excessive speed from 10 - 20 km/h

500,000 - 1,000,000

0

0

Excessive speed over 20 km/h

2,000,000 - 3,000,000

0

30

Passing at the prohibited area

500,000 - 1,000,000

0

0

Driving in prohibited area, opposite side

200,000 - 400,000

0

30

Driving in wrong path of road or lane

200,000 - 400,000

0

0

Non-compliance with the signal of traffic lights

200,000 - 400,000

0

30

Non-compliance with the command of traffic controller

200,000 - 400,000

0

30

Changing direction without reducing speed

200,000 - 400,000

0

0

Changing direction without the signal informing turning direction

200,000 - 400,000

0

0

Level of alcohol in the blood over 0.25mg - 0.4mg/l

500,000 - 1,000,000

7

30

Level of alcohol in the blood over 0.4mg/l

2,000,000 - 3,000,000

7

60

Non-compliance with checking for the levels of alcohol in the blood

2,000,000 - 3,000,000

7

60

Not carrying Registered Certificate of motor, Driving License

80,000 - 120,000

0

0

No carrying insurance Certificate of Motor

80,000 - 120,000

0

0

Not owning a driving license

800,000 - 1,200,000

7

0

Not owning a Registered Certificate of motor

300,000 - 400,000

7

0

Driving a motor with capacity over 175 cm³ without driving license

4,000,000 - 6,000,000

7

0

No wearing helmet

100,000 - 200,000

0

0

Using phone when driving

60,000 - 80,000

0

0

Pulling or pushing other vehicles

200,000 - 400,000

0

0

Taking off 2 hands while driving

5,000,000 - 7,000,000

7

60

Weaving when driving

5,000,000 - 7,000,000

7

60

Driving on one wheel (to 2-wheel vehicle)

5,000,000 - 7,000,000

7

60

Driving self-assembly or self-produced vehicles

800,000 - 1,000,000

confiscating vehicle

60

Overall, after several years living in Vietnam, policemen have only stopped me a few times. Unlike some other Asian countries, it does not seem that the local police are targeting foreigners in particular. If you have all your documents in order and follow the traffic rules, you don't have to worry about being arrested or harassed. If you’ve had a different experience to me, please let us know by posting a comment below!

More information about traffic and driving in Vietnam:

Top 5 Tips for Renting a Motorbike

How to Cross the Road in Vietnam?

Banner Image source: blog.hoozing.com


Identity: American Viet Kieu Millenials

By: JK Hobson

Tax breaks and other benefits for Vietnamese sojourners who return to Vietnam

Reverse Migration is Having a Considerable Effect on Vietnamese Culture and Economy

The Overseas Vietnamese Coming Home Experience is Largely Positive

More than ever, in places like the US, the UK and the EU, immigration is a hot-button topic. Whether this influx of immigration is welcomed with open arms or met with derision, there is an intuitive understanding by most as to why these immigrants and asylum-seekers look to transition from their homelands to new territories in search of greener pastures. It’s a no-brainer, as the countries they gravitate towards have better economies and generally higher standards of living.

While it is true that most Vietnamese immigration moves outward and overseas from Vietnam to the West, there is a significant population of foreign-born of Vietnamese descent who are repatriating to the homeland of their ancestors. What drives Vietnamese-American millennials to return to Vietnam to live, and what effects do these migrations have on their identities, and Vietnam as a developing economy?

What Does it Mean to Be Vietnamese-American?

The term “Viet Kieu, which literally translates as “Vietnamese sojourner” originally had a derogatory connotation, but these days the phrase is more benignly used to distinguish people of Vietnamese descent who live in the diaspora. Since 2004, the term has also indicated a legal status, as the communist government at that time officially declared “Viet Kieu” living abroad as being a vital part of the Vietnamese community.

Vietnamese American Repatriation in VietnamImage source: lawyer-monthly.com

In 2007, the “Viet Kieu” status became more highly elevated when the government began making exemptions for members of the diaspora who could prove that they were of Vietnamese descent. Presently overseas Vietnamese or “Viet Kieu” benefit from tax breaks, loosened restrictions on business licences and property ownership, in addition to having the ability to bring to the country foreign spouses and progeny.

Vietnamese-Americans Changing Society and Economy in Vietnam

The reestablishment of these connections, including repatriation by Vietnamese-Americans, has from the onset had a considerable impact across the country. Remittances have always contributed greatly towards the Vietnam economy. In 2017, the US$13.8 billion in remittances it received accounted for 6.7% of the economy, with Ho Chi Minh city receiving a US$5.2 billion share. Overseas Vietnamese entrepreneurs have played a significant role in reshaping the cultural and economic landscapes. As Peter Cuong Franklin, chef-owner at the new-school restaurant ănăn explained to Vice Magazine... 

“Viet Kieus are making great contributions in the creative fields such as food, art, literature, music and fashion. They bring an international perspective and help to connect Vietnam with the rest of the world”.

Vietnamese American Repatriation in VietnamImage source: gdb.voanews.com

Family and Reasons for the Return ‘Home’

For many Vietnamese American millennials, repatriation is a step towards bridging complicated and deep familial chasms following their parents move to the US after the Vietnamese resistance.

Chrissa Nguyen, 29, is a Vietnamese American makeup artist with her own business that does creative party makeup and costuming for special events, and is a live performer. She spoke with #iAMHCMC about her experiences living in the state of North Dakota, and her migration to Vietnam, her parents’ homeland. 

“I always knew I’d come back to Vietnam. The area I lived in was very White, but my parents raised me in a very Vietnamese household, studying the language, and eating almost exclusively Vietnamese food. When I was young I didn't fit in. I always knew I wanted to come back to Vietnam”.

Vietnamese American Repatriation in VietnamImage source: Chrissa Nguyen

When asked about how her family felt about her decision to repatriate to Vietnam, she explained, “They were really unhappy, because I think as is with a lot of Vietnamese there's a lot of trauma from war and what life was like after the war. Now they see that I'm happy here, so they've totally come to terms with it and accepted it. I don't know if they'll ever visit me here. I don't really have hopes for that. I think they realise that I'm a lot happier here than I ever was in the US and that's what matters to them now”.

Christina Bui, 26, a Vietnamese American woman from Virginia, USA, and project coordinator for the non-profit organisation Pacific Links Foundation, has been a resident of Vietnam since 2015. Like Chrissa, she was met with resistance when expressing her desire to move to Vietnam to her parents. Her mother and father both emigrated to the United States, after Vietnam’s successful resistance, in 1975 and 1986 respectively.

“They hated it at first. I encountered a very strong pushback, especially from my mom, who was vehemently against it (which was understandable given the trauma my family experienced). After talking to my boss on the phone (for three hours, no less) and meeting her in person, my mom became a bit more ‘OK’ with me going. (Also because she thought I’d only be gone for a year! Little did any of us know…)”.

Opportunities Abound

Vietnamese-Americans in Vietnam often find more job opportunities and enjoy a higher level of status than they do back in the United States. Many of them are bilingual, but speak English with a native accent, which both makes them valuable in the job market and gives them a lot of social mobility. Some also express that they feel a greater amount of freedom in Vietnam than they even did in the states. ‘Yeah, I pretty much do whatever I want! It's really great, because coming from New York City which was my home for over ten years, I feel pretty New York in a way. But here, I feel so much more free, and so much more able to freely express myself than I can in New York. I did creative stuff in New York, but not like the stuff I'm doing here. It was hard to think of myself as artistic or anything before I came here. Coming from America, and especially New York oh, you get a lot of “Oh, this country is the best! There's nowhere better than New York. New York is the best! You have the best of everything here!” I was attaching myself to that. I almost wondered how I could be cool outside of New York. I realized after a while that although I love New York, I was never happy there.”

Vietnamese American Repatriation in VietnamImage source: savvytokyo.com

Identity Through Repatriation

For many Vietnamese American millennials, coming to Vietnam helps them to achieve a deeper sense of self, having straddled both Vietnamese and Western identities. 

Chrissa says, “It was difficult when I first came because growing up the way that I did, in between two cultures. Not being White, I couldn't really identify with being American. Coming here I thought that because I grew up in a really Vietnamese household that I understood and knew Vietnamese culture. I had to let go everything that I thought I knew about Vietnamese culture, and also part of my identity. Like, ‘Oh, I'm not actually Vietnamese’. That was something I had to reset in my mind, but it was actually quite freeing to let go of these identity markers. I'm not Vietnamese, I'm not even American. I'm not any of these labels that people assigned to you because of how you look or how you speak”.

Vietnamese American Repatriation in VietnamImage source: tapchihoaky.com

Christina echoes Chrissa’s sentiment... 

“I think I’m more certain of my dual identity now—neither completely American nor completely Vietnamese. At times I feel ‘too American’ for Vietnamese people, and ‘too Vietnamese’ for Americans, but I’ve grown to be more comfortable with those labels. And, of course, it becomes a point of pride to be lauded by my Vietnamese coworkers that I’ve become ‘real Vietnam-Vietnamese’, since it does say something about my assimilation here”.

Chrissa reflects on her consistent excitement about living in Saigon, "It hits me every day. I'll be in traffic and see some signs in Vietnamese or I'll see a guy welding something wearing sunglasses and think, ‘Oh, my god. I live here!’"

Banner Image source: videoblocks.com


Dumps for Cisco 300-410 Preparation: Get Ahead in Your Career

By: City Pass Guide

One of the biggest philosophies to apply during a job-hunting process is to leave a lasting impression. To beat the competition and demonstrate your competency in information technology, you need to set yourself apart by having something extra in your CV — for example, a badge from a globally renowned vendor like Cisco Certifications .

This guide highlights what you might have wanted to know about the new opportunities offered by Cisco to network engineers and system administrators. So, below you’ll find information about their recently Certbolt.com Web URL and the credentials it leads to. Also, we’ll find out shortly if it is possible to prepare using dumps or you need to apply some other methods as well.

About Cisco 300-410 Exam

300-410 focuses on advanced routing ad services and is one of the concentration tests that learners should attempt alongside the core exam, Cisco 350-401 to qualify for CCNP Enterprise. It lasts for 90 minutes and is currently offered in English and Japanese languages with more versions expected to come out in several months. Moreover, even passed alone, 300-410 will bring you a Specialist credential in Enterprise Advanced Infrastructure Implementation.

Speaking of the exam outline in-detail, it covers the following topics:

• Infrastructure Automation
• Infrastructure Services
• Infrastructure Security
• VPN Services
Cisco Certification CCNP 300-420 ENSLD Practice Test Dumps Questions

Certification Details: CCNP Enterprise

The Cisco CCNP Enterprise badge helps students prove their expertise in enterprise networking solutions. Due to the changes in the certification program, you may choose a specific path to earning it. Although the core Cisco Certification CCNP 300-430 ENWLSI Practice Test Dumps Questions is obligatory for all the applicants, when it comes to concentration exam, there are five more options available apart from 300-410. Thus, you can validate your narrowly defined skills in designing Enterprise networks, providing automation, and implementing SD-WAN solutions, to name a few.

Recertification Policy

Like most of the traditional Cisco badges, the Cisco CCNP Enterprise Certification Practice Test Questions Dumps is valid for 3 years. As soon as this period elapses, learners can refresh their knowledge by engaging in different activities as recommended by the certification experts. You may want to visit the Cisco website to find out more information about their recertification policy.

Training with Dumps

Studying with dumps is an invaluable step in your exam preparation journey. If taken from reliable sources, they include real questions from 300-410 providing an important practical insight into the exam. You can use these materials to learn how to manage your time appropriately and identify knowledge gaps you need to work on.

However, before enrolling in your Cisco 300-410 exam and even before starting your training with dumps, it’s important to master all the subject areas and themes that you will be assessed on. For this purpose, you can follow an official Cisco course, read some guides, or refer to video tutorials. This will build a strong base that will help you not only during the assessment but also for performing well at your This Link Here .

Conclusion

How can you show the employers that you are the best candidate for the task? Now you know that having Cisco certification is one of the best answers. Get ahead in your career today by acing your 300-410 exam using valid dumps. Embrace your challenges and adopt a goal-oriented approach that brings nothing but success!


5 photo tips for travelers in Vietnam

By: Vinh Dao

How to capture and keep the Vietnamese breathtaking moment?

For shutterbugs, Vietnam is a paradise full of photographic opportunities. Whether you are into landscapes, street or even food photography, Vietnam has it all. We have put together five tips for taking photos in this picturesque country.

1. Be respectful. When taking photos of people, take the slow approach. Usually a smile or a gesture to your camera is all it takes for someone to allow you to take their photo.

Local insight: Monks and nuns make for great portraiture subjects.

2. Wake up early. When the first rays of sunlight head across the horizon, the light created is softer and colours are warmer and more saturated. Though this effect lasts usually lasts longer than one hour, photographers call this the Golden Hour.

Local insight: The Golden Hour is a great opportunity to snap some images of Hanoians exercising around Hoan Kiem Lake.

3. Take a tripod. This is a must for taking landscape photos and when the light is fading when shutter speeds are slower.

Local insight: Light streaks from the manic traffic in Saigon’s District 1 will create an ethereal feel to any image.

4. Read up about your destination. Finding a relevant tidbit where you are shooting can make the difference of turning a great shot into something stunning.

Local insight: The best time to take photos in Sapa is before the harvest from mid-September to early October when the rice fields are a bright yellow.

5. Use your camera strap. Sling the strap around your neck or across your shoulder to prevent an opportunistic thief from nicking your camera.

Local insight: When walking around in major cities, this is a must as motorbike thieves are drawn to cameras like moths to a flame.


Other articles:

Top 5 tips for crossing the street in Vietnam

Top 5 photo tips for travelers in Vietnam

Top 5 tips to rent a motorbike in Vietnam

5 tips to manage your online reputation on Tripadvisor

5 tips of preparation for better score at golf

5 tips to take pictures of fireworks in Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi

Top 5 tips for preventing theft in Vietnam

The art of bargaining in Vietnam

Tips to spot and avoid scam and pick pocket


Four Female Chefs You Should Know About in Vietnam

By: Lucie Sherwood

Most of us have an image of professional kitchens as being something of a male-dominated boy's club, despite women traditionally doing most of the cooking in private homes for centuries. Whilst women still account for a relatively low portion of professional chefs globally, there are more women enrolling for training and a number of female chefs rank among the best in the world, earning major accolades and awards.

As Vietnam’s foodie landscape grows and evolves, more international and Vietnamese restaurants are opening and drawing in big talents, both local and foreign. Among these rising stars are several talented female chefs who are shaking up Vietnam’s culinary scene with their unique take on Vietnamese and international cuisines, often drawing influence from their diverse geographical backgrounds.

Here are four of the best female chefs in Vietnam right now, and where to eat their food.

Tam Le - Saigonita Concept Rebstaurant in Saigon

Tam Le’s Saigonita is a concept restaurant that reinterprets Mexican cuisine through the lens of Vietnamese ingredients and dishes. The creator and chef hosts her intimate pop-up dinners on select evenings every month. Already, Saigonita is storming the foodie scene in Saigon, with Tam’s dinners booked-out two months in advance.

Tam has had an unconventional route to Saigonita. She was raised in Texas before leaving to work in branding in New York, where she recalls beginning to make her own tortillas after discovering that she could only buy them imported and mass-produced in New York, unlike the fresh tortillas available in grocery stores across Texas. As an Texas-born Vietnamese, she grew up eating both Mexican and Vietnamese cuisines and says, “to combine them was only natural to me”.

Female ChefsImage source: Tam Le

After moving to Vietnam, Tam started to make the Saigonita vision a reality, creating her exciting Vietnamese-Mexican food with encouragement from her friends. As the concept was being developed, Tam Le spent her evenings and weekends experimenting to bring her new dishes to life. Now that her dinners have gained momentum, she is dedicating herself to Saigonita full-time.

The Saigonita menu changes depending on what’s in season and the chef’s mood. Tam describes her Huế-vos Rancheros as a current crowd favourite; a tostada with a fried home-made tortilla base, a layer of refried black beans, beef braised in the style of bún bò Huế, a fried quail egg, finely chopped shallots and herbs, and finished off with a squeeze of calamansi.

Tam doesn’t consider her gender to be challenge in Vietnam’s culinary world. She explains, “I see so many opportunities in Vietnam”, although she acknowledges that the industry is very male-dominated. As her unique concept becomes increasingly popular, she describes her goal as, “to figure out how to allow everyone who wants to try Saigonita to be able to experience it”.

Nikki Tran - Cau Ba Quan and Cau Ba Noodles Restaurants in Saigon

Famous for her appearance on the Netflix hit series Ugly Delicious, Nikki Tran is dishing up her brand of ‘Viejun’ (Vietnamese-Cajun) food in her two modern Vietnamese seafood restaurants; Cau Ba Quan and Cau Ba Noodles in Ho Chi Minh City.

A Saigon native who has spent time in Houston, Texas - where the Viet-Cajun trend began - Nikki describes her cooking as a collaboration between Vietnamese culture and other cultures, but is adamant that her food isn’t branded as ‘fusion’.

Nikki never trained as a professional chef, nor did she have any aspirations to cook, but she was thrown into the kitchen when the chef didn’t show up on the opening night. Now she loves to create new dishes and her aspiration is to bring modern Vietnamese food to the mainstream, showing the cuisine from a different angle.

Female ChefsImage source: Nikki Tran

Nikki acknowledges the challenges of working in a male-dominated industry, describing how gaining authority in the kitchen can be difficult for women working in a traditionally patriarchal society such as Vietnam. She added that even in the US, it isn’t easy to command respect from the other chefs in a professional kitchen. She also expressed her belief that the conventional female roles within a family in Vietnam can limit their ability to work long hours.

Nevertheless, Nikki feels that there are a lot of opportunities out there for aspiring female chefs to be noticed, stating, “the creativity brought by women is highly anticipated and appreciated”. She advises women to be tough in the kitchen and to have confidence that female chefs can do whatever male chefs can do, whether its scaling a fish or butchering a whole cow.

Nguyễn Thị Hồng Huệ - Stoker Restaurant in Saigon

Stoker has been making waves in Saigon’s culinary scene for some time now, and its Junior Sous Chef, Nguyễn Thị Hồng Huệ, is one of the restaurant’s rising stars. Stoker’s speciality is cooking meats using various techniques involving fire, perhaps making the presence of a strong female chef even more unusual.

Female ChefsImage source: Hue Nguyen

After studying finance, Hue embarked on her chef’s training and gained experience in a number of professional kitchens before joining Stoker in May 2017. She worked in the cold kitchen and In pastry before being promoted to Junior Sous Chef.

Working with Stoker’s Executive Chef, George Bloomfield, Hue has created new signature dishes for the popular steakhouse, including Smoked Milk Panna Cotta and Woodfired Basque Cheesecake.

Hue explains that she finds Ho Chi Minh City “one of the best places to explore local and international food”, with its eclectic range of restaurants and diverse food scene. Hue highlighted that this environment creates lots of opportunities for female chefs to develop their careers. She says that, “women in general are well-known for being careful, resourceful and tidy; which are good values for a chef”.

Her advice to aspiring female chefs is to “follow your passion”, acknowledging that things can be difficult at the beginning but these challenges can be overcome. Hue's goal is to eventually gain experience and learn about Northern Vietnamese cuisine by spending time working in Hanoi.

Summer Le - Nen Restaurant in Danang

Now an unofficial global ambassador for Central Vietnamese cuisine, Chef Summer Le has been expressing her passion for the food of her home-region at her acclaimed restaurant, Nen, since August 2017. The ethos of Nen - a spice specific to Central Vietnam - is to push the boundaries of Vietnamese cuisine whilst retaining its core values.

Female ChefsImage source: Summer Le

Before opening her Danang restaurant, she was a food blogger and has been featured on several cooking shows including the Asia Food Channel’s 'Home-cooked Vietnam'. Despite Nen being a reasonably young restaurant, it has received wide attention, being visited by the Prime Minister of New Zealand and three Michelin star Chef Dominique Crenn from the US.

Summer Le explains her food philosophy as, “utilising local ingredients and making them the star of the dishes” in order to create her modern Vietnamese dishes. She aims to keep the taste profiles essentially Vietnamese, while using some foreign techniques and presentation. She describes her food as, “a reflection of myself” creative, intellectual, with great attention to detail”. She explains that she especially loves to experiment with elevating often overlooked ingredients in Vietnamese cuisine, such as duck, certain fruits and fermented sauces.

Nen’s New Vietnamese multi-course tasting menu is a collection of Summer Le’s signature dishes, including a pan-seared duck breast with mango gel and Viet satay chili paste with cashew nuts and dried mango.

Summer Le feels Vietnam is open-minded when it comes to women in the workplace in comparison with some of its neighbouring countries. She points out that the industry is heavily male-dominated, but cites the physical requirements of the job as one of the reasons for this. At Nen, she hires both male and female chefs on her team, explaining that, “they have their own strengths”. She details, “attention to detail, deftness and discipline” as qualities she often finds in her female chefs and which are particularly relevant in a fine-dining restaurant. Her advice to aspiring female chefs is to, “find your unique strength as a chef and pursue it”.

Banner Image source: citypassguide.com


Increase Your Effectiveness by Managing Your Time

By: Victor Burrill

“Effectiveness is a habit and that you can improve through practice.” - Peter F. Drucker

We all have the same amount of time so why does it seem that some people are able to get more out of their day. Believe it or not, they have learnt the skill of how to properly manage their time to build their effectiveness. You too can learn this valuable skill and no matter how long you’ve been in the workplace, it’s never too late to learn.

Goal Setting

After getting to know my clients, one of the first things I ask them is ‘where do you want to be?’ One way I sometimes ask this is ‘What would be different say in two years’ time from now?’

Setting goals, or knowing which direction you are going is fundamental in clarifying your ideas, focusing your efforts, use your time and resources productively, and increase your chances of achieving what you want in life. To make sure your goals are clear and reachable, each one should be SMART which is:

- Specific (clear and concise).

- Measurable (the ability to track your progress).

- Achievable (challenging yet attainable).

- Relevant (set goals that are relevant to your overall plan).

- Time bound (goals should have a target finish time attached).

The Power of Focus

Tim Cook, the COO of Apple said “We are the most focused company that I know of or have read of or have any knowledge of. We say no to good ideas every day. We say no to great ideas in order to keep the amount of things we focus on very small in number so that we can put enormous energy behind the ones we do choose.” Like Apple’s success, you too can achieve amazing results on focusing your efforts and doing a good job on those things you decided to do and eliminating unimportant opportunities.

Time Management

Keeping the amount of goals you have to less than three increases the likelihood that you will reach them all with excellence. Statistics show that those who have more than four goals are likely to achieve only 1 or 2 of them. If you have over 11 goals, you are unlikely to reach any.

Learning to say ‘NO’ is a skill many successful people have mastered. Take billionaire Warren Buffett, for example. With all the demands on him, Buffett learned a long time ago that his most valuable resource is his time. He has mastered the art and practice of setting boundaries for himself. The mega-mogul once said, "The difference between successful people and really successful people is that really successful people say no to almost everything.

Executive coaching guru, Dr. Marshal Goldsmith says that one of the greatest lessons Peter Drucker taught him is:

“We spend a lot of time helping leaders learn what to do. We do not spend enough time teaching leaders what to stop. Half of the leaders I have met don’t need to learn what to do. They need to learn what to stop.”

As a coach, I have found that much of my work is helping leaders work out what they need to stop doing in order to focus on their most important priorities.

You may also want to start by looking at your schedule or to-do-list every day and for simplicity try to get down five tasks you need to accomplish. Using the principle you can probably eliminate the majority of the items on your list. It may feel unnatural at first but overtime this will condition you to scale up effort on the most important tasks.

Learning How You Spend Time Will Help You Save Time

When it comes to managing your time, you may need to find out where your time actually goes. You may believe that you only send 30 minutes on emails, but in reality that task might be eating-up an hour of your day. The easiest way to keep track of your time is to download an app like RescueTime, Toggl or my app Calendar to track everything you do in a week. You can then find out what’s stealing your time and make the appropriate adjustments.I've found that setting a time limit to each task prevents me from getting distracted or procrastinating. if I don’t complete the task on time, I can still work on it without eating into the time reserved for something else.

Virtual meetings - thanks to rapidly advancing technology, we have more and more choice on ways to run a meeting. Of course, to say that online meetings can simply replace all face-to-face meetings is unrealistic.

Batching similar tasks together such as emails and phone calls. I know effective managers who schedule a specific time to handle these tasks such as late morning and towards the end of the day.

I also plan my week to avoid wasting time waiting. If I do find that I have a delay, I make the best of it. For example, whist waiting I’ll read an inspirational book, listen to a podcast, or make those important calls.

Time Management

Delegation and outsourcing can get a bit difficult for some but are real time-savers since it lessens your workload - which means you have more time to spend on more important tasks. Either hand over responsibilities to team members who are qualified or hire an experienced freelancer. Time training will be worth-it in the end.

Leaving a buffer-time between tasks and meetings can help performance. Jumping immediately from one task or meeting to the next may seem like a good use of your time, but it actually has the opposite effect. We need time to clear our minds and recharge. After all, the human brain can only focus for about 90-minutes at a time. Without that break it’s more difficult to stay focused and motivated. Scheduling buffer-time also can prevent running late to your next meeting.

The Power of Planning

A lot of successful leaders spend time thinking on how they will achieve their priorities. Spending time planning keeps you focused on your goals as well as giving you the opportunity to build contingency for a possible crisis and help you work out how to avoid interruptions.

One of the worst things that you can do is wake-up without a plan for the day. Before leaving work for the day, spend the last 15-minutes organizing your office and composing a list of your most important items for tomorrow. During your morning routine write down the 3 or 4 most urgent and important matters that need to be addressed today and work on those when you’re most productive.

Spend your mornings on your most important tasks (MIT’s). Mark Twain once said, "If it's your job to eat a frog, it's best to do it first thing in the morning. And If it's your job to eat two frogs, it's best to eat the biggest one first." Gross? Sure. But, the point that Twain was making that you should take care your biggest and most-challenging tasks in the morning, aka your most important tasks (MITs) of the day.

There are a couple reasons why this is such an effective time management trick. For starters, you usually have the most amount of energy in the morning. So it’s better to tackle these tasks when you’re not drained. Also, you can use that feeling of accomplishment to get through the rest of the day.

Be Energized and Inspired

There is a reason why successful leaders exercise regally. Even a short burst of fun cardio activity works wonders, especially in the morning. This is because exercise releases endorphins, serotonin, and other happy chemicals in your brain. According to renowned psychologist Shawn Achor, the reason why exercise is so key to your morning routine is that it literally trains your brain to believe "my behavior matters," which then carries (positively) into other activities throughout the day. And for procrastinators, exercising when you least feel like it is when it does the most good.

Time Management

I use inspirational sources like a TED Talk or biography. It’s a simple way to reignite that fire to get me motivated and back-on-track.

Change your schedule. If you’re reading this article then it’s obviously because you want to discover some useful time management skills. If you’re struggling with being effective, the solution may be as simple as changing your schedule around. For example, instead of sleeping-in until 6:30am, wake-up an hour earlier. Personally, I find 5:15am to be the most productive time of the day since it gives me time to exercise, plan-out my day, go through my emails, and even work on side projects without being disturbed.

*Victor Burrill is an internationally certified coach, leadership trainer and is Chairman of the Business Executive Network Vietnam.

Image source: Shutter Stock

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