Traditions of Vietnamese New Year (Tet Nguyen Dan)

By: Fabrice Turri

Tết Nguyên Đán, or simply Tết, is the most celebrated and important holiday in Vietnam.

Tết rites begin with Ong Tao, one of a group of omniscient kitchen gods named Táo Quân, hand-delivering a report to the Jade Emperor in Heaven about affairs in the family home.

It is widely believed that this report affects family destiny or extends or shortens life spans according to actions over the course of the previous year. Ông Táo’s report keeps him in Heaven for six days until he returns home in the night between the old and the new year. Most merchants close during Tết celebrations, so people try to stock up on supplies, food, clothing and home decorations. The streets and markets are crowded with people in the days before Tết and then deserted during the festivities.

Tết takes place on the first day of the first lunar month (late January/early February), a special day when the souls of ancestors return to earth. 2016 is the year of the monkey. The lunar calendar years are named after animals: rat, ox, tiger, cat, dragon, snake, horse, goat, monkey, rooster, dog and pig.

The first day of Tết is reserved to the core of the family. Children receive a red envelope called lì xì (or 'lucky money') containing money from their elders. To bring good luck, cash bills must be new and free from bends or rips. As for adults, it is customary to offer various gifts of wine, biscuits, sweets or jam.

Vietnamese families usually have a family altar to honour their ancestors. Upon this they will place a tray of five different fruits called mâm ngũ quả. During Tết, the altar is cleaned and new offerings are placed. As Tết is the time to welcome family ancestors, one’s house must be thoroughly cleaned to make it as welcoming as possible.

When welcoming visitors on Tết, vigilance is essential. It is believed that the first person to visit one’s home on Tết will bring either good or bad luck to a family for the following year. Thus, a rich and respected visitor would bring happiness and good fortune while the converse is also true.

Home decoration is an important part of Tết festivities. The house is believed to be protected against evil spirits by a kumquat tree, which symbolises fertility. In the north part of the country a branch of pink peach flowers called hoa đào is displayed. In central and southern regions branches of golden apricot blossoms (hoa mai) are used. Bright colours are worn to attract good luck in the coming year.

During Tết special food is served, each with its own characteristics such as luck, prosperity, health or longevity. (Incidentally, before the advent of electric rice cookers, it was considered a bad omen for the coming year if rice was burned at the bottom of the pan.)

Bánh chưng is a square, steamed cake, an indispensable dish of Tết. It was invented during the Hùng King Dynasty and is rectangular to symbolize the Earth. This cake is made ​​from glutinous rice, mung beans and pork, and wrapped in banana leaves. All families place bánh chưng on their ancestral altar as an offering.

Bánh dầy, with its circular base of glutinous rice, symbolises Heaven. With these two cakes, bánh chưng and bánh dầy, Vietnamese pay homage to ancestors and Heaven and Earth.

Boiled or steamed chicken plays an important role during Tet meals. Indeed, all meals that pay tribute to ancestors must indeed contain a boiled chicken. The chicken is served with sticky rice and bánh chưng.

Xôi is glutinous rice of several types. Xôi gấc is one such type that is preferred by many Vietnamese for its red colour – red symbolises luck. This sticky rice is usually served with cooked chicken.

Mứt is candied fruit and Mứt Tết is a Vietnamese jam served with tea. This jam, in its dry form, is always kept in beautiful boxes and placed on the table when serving tea.

Finally, during Tết, Vietnamese stay polite and smiling, under the watchful eyes of three statues (Phúc, Lộc and Thọ) representing happiness, prosperity and longevity.

The main greeting at Tet is, ‘Chúc mừng năm mới’, which translates to ‘Happy New Year’.
Sources: platvietnam.com, www.baroude.com 


Adding A Stroke of Art To City Pass Guide

By: City Pass Guide

Vietnam in new style of capture

Richie Fawcett

British sketch artist Richie Fawcett has been living and working in Vietnam for almost three years, but it’s only in this past year that he, and everyone around him, has begun taking his inherent drawing skills seriously. Richie initially ventured to Vietnam to open a variety of bars and restaurants – something he’s spent a fantastic 15 years doing around the world.

Richie soon realised, however, how lucky he was to be in a country where he was surrounded by a visual feast, a photographer’s dream.

As a professional photographer in London in the late 90s Richie had been searching for an alternative way to capture the essence of the street scenes that had always intrigued him. Using a camera seemed far too easy - there was no reason for him to stay in the same spot and analyse a scene for hours on end.

At that point, Richie drudged up his long lost, and virtually unknown, talent and begun sketching his favourite street scenes and cityscapes.

Richie’s time in Vietnam, especially living in central Saigon, is what reignited his interest in sketching. Being able to capture the vibrancy of the people and culture gave him renewed energy to physically realise the way in which people live and work in the rapidly changing urban landscape of Saigon. 

Another aspect that has motivated him to start sketching again, is his appreciation for history and the fact at Saigon, especially, is developing so quickly; many of the old historic buildings of central Saigon have been torn down to make way for new developments.

Although the sites of these developments are often left untouched for years, it’s prompted him to capture the life of the city’s old streets before they’re lost forever. A specific instance of this can be seen in Richie’s four original drawings of Ben Thanh Market  - North, South, East and West.

These were drawn because there is a building development opposite that will one day obstruct the view of the Museum of Fine Arts  – a favourite and, thus, a place in which he has spent countless hours exploring. In fact, he’s spent so much time in and around this building that the staff know him commonly as Waisee . There’s always an exchange of smiles, “Xin chao,” and, “Have a look at what I’m drawing today.

Richie Fawcett

Richie often gets the same reactions when people catch him drawing a scene: they’re either really excited, “Dep dep dep!” or they im/mediately stop talking, have a seat and stare for ages. It’s a brilliant, and yet disarming, way in which he connects with the community. His connection goes as far as the street sellers who actually stop hassling him after seeing him frequent the same spot hour after hour – they’ve even been known to stop working and sit next to him while he draws.

Richie’s sketches now take an average of 4 - 5 continuous hours. This may seem like a long time, but in the beginning they would take weeks, even months, of dedicated time going back and forth to the same spot each day. The result of this work is a collection of panoramic cityscapes in pencil, pen, ink and Chinese ink wash. 

His style of work begins with a skyline, and ends with the characterisation of the people in the landscape. He has a second small pocket sketchbook crammed full of countless individual characters going about their daily tasks.

Since beginning his sketching, Richie has already held a successful solo exhibition at Au Parc titled, ‘Carte Postale de Saigon’ . He has been interviewed for Tuoi Tre TV and has been on the national news, celebrated as a foreigner who appreciates and expresses Vietnamese culture in his own artistic manner. As a result of this exposure, he now has a following of private collectors.

It was on the night of his very first exhibition that he bumped into Patrick Gaveau of City Pass Guide, who happened to be getting a takeaway, but took away an instant interest in Richie’s artwork instead. They im/mediately set a date to meet. The rest, as they say, is history.

Richie went on his first trip to Hanoi during Tet where he managed to produce over 15 panoramic cityscapes in six days. Hanoi has left a fantastic impression on him, and he’ll soon be back to capture the plethora of scenes still available.

Richie Fawcett

He’s currently planning a travelling exhibition, ‘A Tale of Two Cities’, exclusively featuring his signature panoramic cityscapes from both Saigon and Hanoi. It will feature both old and new meter-long sketches demonstrating the contrast between two astounding cities in an amazing country.

The exhibition will be shown in both Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, with dates to be confirmed; watch this space for updates.

In addition to numerous individual commissions from businesses and residencies, Richie is currently working on sketching the vibrancy of Vietnamese life for the 11th edition of the City Pass Guide and for their upcoming website and mobile applications.


He looks forward to continued collaborations with City Pass Guide, where he is able to showcase his work while providing invaluable pieces for the premium travel guide company. And to think, it’s all thanks to a takeaway and a chance meeting.

Authors & Editors: Richie Fawcett & Kendra Bernard

Richie Fawcett


2018 - The Year in Pictures

By: Nhu Tong

The Year in Review

A look at the people, places and events that defined 2018 and what’s coming up next.

2018 - Year of the Dog

January 27: Vietnam’s under-23 youth football league makes it to the final of the continental championships in China

Vietnam's HighlightsImage source: 24h.com.vn

March 23: State funeral of Vietnam’s Prime Minister, Phan Văn Khải

Vietnam's HighlightsImage source: tintucvietnam.vn

March 23: A deadly fire in a Saigon apartment complex - Carina Plaza - kills 13 residents.

Vietnam's HighlightsImage source: kenh14.com

April 4: Uber officially ceases its operations in Vietnam

Vietnam's HighlightsImage source: vntoday.xyz

June: Ba Na Hills near Danang opens its now Instagram famous Golden Bridge

Vietnam's HighlightsImage source: lonelyplanetwpnews.net

July 22: Vietnam witnesses the longest lunar eclipse of 21st century

Vietnam's HighlightsImage source: danangfantasticity.com

July 27: Landmark 81, the tallest building in Vietnam, opens in Saigon

Vietnam's HighlightsImage source: i.ytimg.com

September 17: Tran Tieu My from Quang Nam Province is crowned Miss Vietnam

Vietnam's HighlightsImage source: vietnammoi.vn

September 21: Vietnam’s President Trần Đại Quang passes away

Vietnam's HighlightsImage source: reatimes.vn

October 2: Vinfast introduces the first ever “Made in Vietnam” cars at the Paris Motor Show 2018

Vietnam's HighlightsImage source: thoidai.com.vn

October 23: Nguyen Phu Trong nominated President of Vietnam

Vietnam's HighlightsImage source: daidoanket.vn

December 15: Vietnam crowned champions of AFF Suzuki Cup 2018

Vietnam's HighlightsImage source: foxsportsasia.com

December 11: Thai Son Nam, a futsal club in the Vietnam National futsal league, is nominated for the world’s best futsal award.

Vietnam's HighlightsImage source: hff.vn

December 17: Vietnam's representative H'Hen Niê made it to the top 5 Miss Universe

Vietnam's HighlightsImage source: znews.vn

2019 - Year of the Pig

- Vietnam will host ASEAN Tourism Cooperation in Ha Long City

Vietnam's HighlightsImage source: amazingplaces.com

- HCMC will launch seven new waterway tour routes

Vietnam's HighlightsImage source: urbanistnetwork.com

- Vietnam expects to reach a 6.6%-6.8% GDP growth in 2019

Vietnam's HighlightsImage source: cafeland.vn

- Phase 1 begins on Long Thanh Airport, projected to be finished by 2025.

Vietnam's HighlightsImage source: heerim.com

- One of the biggest Travel Trends in Vietnam in 2019 will be ecological tours according to a survey by trekksoft.com

Vietnam's HighlightsImage source: indochinamotorbiketours.com

Banner Image source:lonelyplanetwpnews.net


Top things to do in Quy Nhon

By: Fabrice Turri

Relatively unknown and free of mass tourism, the coastal city of Quy Nhon (the capital of Binh Dinh province in central Vietnam) will seduce those who love to travel off the beaten tracks.

Called ‘Pulo Cambi’ by Portuguese Jesuits who settled there in the 1620s, its origins date back to 11th century Champa culture.

Quy Nhon is also known as the birthplace of the eighteenth Vietnamese Emperor, Nguyen Hue. The city experienced a major U.S. military presence and its hinterland was the scene of heavy fighting during the Vietnam War. However, only a half-buried U.S. tank (on the beach, south of the Lan Anh Hotel) reflects this dark parenthesis of history.

Quy Nhon made up the main port for all military forces in Vietnam’s Central Highlands region. Almost all the supplies for the area were unloaded from ships moored in the port before being transported by aircraft.

A large number of U.S. Army support units were also based in the city and its suburbs, including a field hospital and a large supply center.

Quy Nhon In 1975 the South Vietnam Navy evacuated its soldiers and some civilians before abandoning the strategic city of Nha Trang in May 1975, leaving North Vietnamese tanks and infantry to occupy nearly half of the territory of the Republic of South Vietnam.

Today, things have changed.

Quy Nhon has just begun to capitalize on its huge potential for tourism. At 42 km long, the coast is indeed ​​remarkable with its white sand beaches. Abundant seafood is served in local restaurants at a price that defies competition.

And if historical remnants aren’t Quy Nhon’s greatest strength, we must admit the city and its outskirts still contain some interesting sites worth visiting.

Quy NhonThe picturesque Queen’s Beach, in particular, deserves a visit.

Named in memory of last Vietnamese Emperor Bao Dai’s wife, Queen’s Beach is accessible via An Duong Vuong Street, with your back to the peninsula.

On the way, a paved road leads to a ledge where you can see the tomb of famous Vietnamese writer Han Mac Tu, one of the great figures of Vietnamese literature. Further on, you’ll come to the famous beach where you can stop for refreshments.

Although not a good place for swimming, Queen’s Beach is interesting because of its many blue, egg-shaped, smooth stones superimposed on the small beach pummeled by waves. That is why Queen’s Beach is also called ‘Egg Stone Beach’.

Continuing on the road along the headland, you arrive at Qui Hoa Beach, very quiet and ideal for swimming. A hospital Leproserythat specialises in treating leprosy has been built nearby. In its charming garden, you can admire statues of famous French and Vietnamese doctors. Visitors are welcome.

Arguably the best spot for swimming is probably Bai Dai Beach, a beautiful stretch of white, fine sand.

Located on 13.5 hectares, Bai Dai Beach is frequented by few tourists. With a beautiful view of Cu Lao Xanh Island, Bai Dai remains quite wild. Activities available from the beach include kayak trips to neighboring islands.

The Cham towers of Banh It (20 km north of Quy Nhon, at the top of a hill that boasts panoramic views of the countryside) and those nearest to Thap Doi are remarkable for their sculptures. Despite their years, both sites are in good condition and worth visiting.

If you have time, you can also have a look at Long Khanh Pagoda, Quy Nhon’s main pagoda, built in the 18th century and famous for its 17-meter-high Buddha.

Practical Information:

- Binh Dinh Province is 1065 km from Hanoi and 680 km from Ho Chi Minh City. You can get to Binh Dinh by car, train or plane. Note that the train stops at Dieu Tri Train Station, about 10 km west of Quy Nhon.

- There is a VND 5000 admission fee to Queen Beach (plus an extra 2000 if you’re riding a motorcycle).

- You can go to the hospital that treats leprosy by turning left at the end of An Duong Vuong Street. The hospital entrance is well marked, a few hundred meters further down the road.


Other articles:

Top 5 things to do in Saigon

Top 5 things to do in Danang

Top 5 souvenirs to buy in Vietnam

Top 5 dishes to try in Nha Trang

Top 5 things to do in Nha Trang

Top 5 dishes to eat in Hanoi

Top 5 places to go shopping in Ho Chi Minh City

Top 5 Che-sweet soups must try in Saigon



What to do in Phu Yen, Tuy Hoa?

By: Bob Johnston

Phu Yen, Tuy Hoa…why bother

That’s the question however, the answer is getting easier with every year. Lonely Planet tells you to pass it by; most of the other guidebooks give it a small paragraph at best but say about the same thing. The ones that provide any information at all are telling you things which are six to ten years out of date at best.

Until last summer, when someone got off the bus or train here and found our place, the few visitors would ask ‘So, how many tourists do you normally get here?’ My pat answer was ‘Tourists here are like Bigfoot sightings in other places.’ Then, last spring, some Russians picked Tuy Hoa as a destination; since then (through no fault of the Ministry of Travel and Tourism) we seem to be getting more casual visitors to the area.

What Phu Yen, Tuy Hoa can offer

Tower in Phu YenThose looking for a highly charged night life will be sadly disappointed, it just ain’t here. There is one ‘disco’ operated by the same group who own the CenDelux hotel complex. It’s populated by a very small group of zombie-like young men most of the time. The same area is peppered with karaoke bars as is the rest of the town.

What we do offer is a dip into the real Vietnam with very short travel times to do so…we can offer relaxation and a severe lack of street peddlers. Chill time of the first order.

Miles of deserted beaches, short trip times will get you deep into the farming country or into the lush green of the local mountains. Tuy Hoa is a nice clean town to walk around in with friendly people where you will still find relaxed tourism. Trekking around or into the hills is relaxing, enjoyable and convenient. However, you won’t find many amenities so plan on bringing your own.

Also, you won’t find tourist information readily available. A simple thing like a local map with points of interest listed makes a showing once in a while then quickly becomes unavailable. The major points of interest (in the province) can be found by doing a quick search on-line; getting to most of them takes some work.

When to visit Phu Yen, Tuy Hoa

There is no hard and fast rule about ‘best time’; the best guess answer to that is normally April through the end of September, give or take a month on either end. It all depends on the weather patterns. Two years ago a Vnese friend announced that the monsoon season was over when the sun came out for a week in February; at the end of that week the sun went away and it rained for the next three weeks solid.

How to get to Phu Yen, Tuy Hoa

Located about half way between Nha Trang and Qui Nhon it’s about a two and a half hour trip by bus from either city. There is a local bus service from Qui Nhon which runs pretty much hourly seven days a week. Both north and southbound trains have this as a stop about 6 times a day and there is a ‘local’ which originates in Qui Nhon and runs south to Phan Rieng some days (they don’t really have that schedule nailed down yet).

By air, no problem. There’s a small plane going north or south once a day so you can arrive in the morning or mid-afternoon. The airport is a short taxi ride from town.

You can also find some tips for accommodation and food in Phu Yen, Tuy Hoa in my next article.


Other articles:

Top 5 things to do in Saigon

Top 5 things to do in Danang

Top 5 souvenirs to buy in Vietnam

Top 5 things to do in Quy Nhon

Top 5 dishes to try in Nha Trang

Top 5 things to do in Nha Trang

Top 5 dishes to eat in Hanoi

Top 5 places to go shopping in Ho Chi Minh City

Top 5 Che-sweet soups must try in Saigon



Is Tet Trung Thu still there ?

By: Quang Mai

“Why not? It is still there! Can’t you see all the mooncake boxes ready for gifts? Aren’t you going to the neighborhood with all the lanterns where children are asking their parents for the most beautiful festival stuff? Mooncake StallAnd surely you didn’t miss the preparations for the festival events for this weekend?” Yes, Vietnam is surely preparing to celebrate one of the most traditional and popular family holidays.


According to legend, Tet Trung Thu, Full moon Festival or Mid-autumn moon Festival is for parents to make up for lost time with their children after harvest season. Appropriately, this could be called the Children’s festival. With the harvest finished in September, parents turn their attention back to family life with an opportunity to show love and appreciation for their kid in the most charming and fanciful night of the year – the full moon night of August in lunar calendar. The festival brings the family back together, as well as to celebrate a successful harvest that has separated family members for at least 3 months.



Children’s festival


Baby with lanternIn the cities, the streets are still full of people celebrating the tradition of family bonding. During the festival, parents buy their children toys such as rattles, drums and lanterns at the lantern neighborhood. In the past glossy paper lanterns with tiny candles inside were common place as the traditional festival toy, more child-safe modern battery-run lanterns have become more popular.


Carrying beautiful lanterns while singing and parading along the streets is a tradition of Tet Trung Thu. Little boys and girls walk hand in hand along the streets and show the best of their lanterns to their friends. They may also enjoy hearing from elders the legend of Cuội, whose wife was jealous of the magical banyan tree which can cure illnesses. In a jealous rage, she desecrated the tree. The tree then unrooted itself and rose up until it finally reached the moon. Desperate to keep the tree, Cuội tried his best to pull it down but unfortunately was pulled up with the tree and left his wife lonely on the ground. Every year, during the Tet Trung Thu, children light lanterns and participate in a procession to show Cuội the way back to Earth.



Side activities during Tet Trung Thu


Lion Dance


In Vietnam, there are many traditional activities for both adults and children during the festival including lion dances performed by both trained professional groups and amateurs. Lion dance groups perform on the streets and go to houses asking for permission to perform for the people living there. If accepted by the hosts, the ‘lion’ will go in and start dancing to wish the household good luck and fortune. The Earth Lord, ‘OngDia’, dances around the dragon, urging it on. 'OngDia', who has a smiling moon-shaped face, represents the prosperity and wealth of the earth.


Gifting and tasting mooncakeswith relatives, friends and colleagues is an indispensable delicacy for this festival. Mooncakes are perfectly packaged in square box with red or gold theme to demonstrate prosperity and wealth.The cakes are filled with lotus seeds, ground beans and orange peels and have a bright egg yolk in the center to represent the moon.


Vietnamese parents tell their children fairy tales and serve mooncakes along with other special treats under the silvery moon. A favorite folklore tale is the story behind the mythical symbol, "Ca Hoa Rong" who was a carp that wanted to become a dragon. In the story, the carp worked harder and worked harder and eventually transformed itself into a dragon. Parents use this story to encourage their children to work hard so that they can become whatever they want to be.



Festive Events in 2012


In Hanoi, on September 28th and 29th, from 5:00 PM onward, West Lake Park will feature children musical shows with a special activity for kids to make mooncakes. The West Lake Water Park has also organized a special family event on September 30th.


Bao Son Paradise also organizes an outstanding performance with laser lights, fireworks with lots of well-known Hanoian co/medians.


Visit lantern neighborhood on Hàng Mã Street in Hanoi.


In Nha Trang, Vinpearl Land offers wide range of culutral activites for children such as lighting up lantern, parading around the playground and plenty of performances like dancing, singing, magical show, "nhảy sạp" (dance with bamboo poles) in 2 days 29th and 30th. From now, you can travel to Vinpearl Land and receive special mooncakes made by Vinpearl Luxury Đà Nẵng.


In HCMC, Saigon Sky Deck will display 200 lanterns in the “Lantern Galore” from September 23th – 29th


Visit lantern neighborhood on Lương Nhữ Học Street from now (please don’t take any pictures if you don’t intend to buy any products)


Not only locals, but also foreign tourists are warmly welcomed to join in this special festival. So come out and take part in the event, seeing children carrying the lanterns, eating cakes and receiving gifts of celebration during the Tet Trung Thu!


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